Gov. Gina Raimondo’s recent roll out of more than $4 million in job training grants to a bevy of Rhode Island agencies likely includes some money that may end up training Connecticut workers, RIPR has learned.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

The Rhode Island Trucking Association said Monday it's filing an open record request to learn additional details about Governor Gina Raimondo's controversial truck-toll proposal, after previous requests for the information went unanswered.

A fire in the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning system on the roof of the Textron building created billowing smoke that could be seen for miles away Sunday morning.

Firefighters brought the fire under control shortly after reporting to the scene. The blaze was reported at about 10:30 AM.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation. Public safety commissioner Steve Pare said the cause is not believed to be suspicious.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave sit down with president and CEO of Collette of Pawtucket, Dan Sullivan. Sullivan is a travel industry veteran, whose company organizes guided vacations and tours all over the world. The three talk about how the travel industry has been affected by the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, what travelers should know about security, and the growing popularity of Cuba as a travel destination.

When to listen:

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

It’s the day after Thanksgiving, for many that means door-buster deals, and low-priced consumer electronics, but in Rhode Island the day also offers an opportunity to give back.

For the 19th year in a row, local political activist Greg Gerritt has organized a ‘Buy-Nothing Day’ winter coat drive, the day after Thanksgiving. The statewide drive operates donation and pickup sites at locations across Rhode Island.

Gerritt said he thinks of the event as an antidote to a society too driven by consuming.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

This month we bring you a special, Thanksgiving Rhode Island  Artscape. We take look at the art and the history of the Thanksgiving menu, and how it’s changed

John Bender / RIPR

As families across the state prepare to put their Thanksgiving turkeys in the oven for a long roasting, some may wonder, just where that fowl came from. Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender visited one poultry farm in West Greenwich to find out more about raising these traditional birds. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

On this Thanksgiving day, most Rhode Islanders are enjoying a big meal and time with family and friends. But there’s no time off for the state’s emergency departments – ready around the clock to treat whatever comes their way. 

Rhode Island Hospital emergency department director Dr. David Portelli says that’s usually kitchen accidents, and the results of overindulgence. “When we do look at the numbers, we do see there’s more lacerations – about three times as many by percent – and some more episodes of congestive heart failure.”

David Sullivan, Rhode Island’s well-regarded state tax administrator, is leaving his post in state government for a private sector job.

T.F. Green Airport Security Gate
Catherine Welch / RIPR

Thanksgiving is one of the busiest travel periods of the year. T.F. Green Airport officials expect a rush through Sunday. But they’ve planned ahead to help travelers unwind.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

For her first Thanksgiving as governor, Gina Raimondo says she’ll be with family at her mother’s home in Greeneville. Raimondo says the menu for 20 will include some typical dishes.

“And we’ll have all the regular fixings plus...a lot of macaroni," said Raimondo. "Of course we’ll have the turkey and the stuffing, but in our house it wouldn’t be Thanksgiving if you don’t also have the pasta.”

Raimondo says she wishes all Rhode Islanders a Happy Thanksgiving. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving, and like most of us, the men at the maximum-security prison in Cranston will sit down to a Thanksgiving meal. Their turkey and stuffing will be seasoned with herbs harvested from their prison garden. 

This I Believe Rhode Island: Miracles

Nov 24, 2015

  The nineteenth century novelist Joseph Conrad once wrote, “My task, which I am trying to achieve is, by the power of the written word, to make you hear, to make you feel--it is, before all, to make you see.”  And that is exactly what this NPR series aims to do.  Featured essayists stitch together words that let you peek inside their core beliefs, their struggles to understand their world, their insights about what matters most in life.  Sometimes these words are expressed in prose, sometimes in poetry.  And as Rhode Island's outgoing state poet Rick Benjamin notes, sometimes we enjoy both poetry and prose.

Rick Benjamin has served as the state poet of Rhode Island since 2013.  He will be departing shortly for a new position in California.

Health care spending in Rhode Island has been relatively flat, even decreasing in some areas. That’s according to a new study about the total cost of health care in the state. 

In fact, Rhode Island has some of the lowest health care costs in New England. But out-of-pocket spending for health care in Rhode Island – on things like co-pays and deductibles - has been increasing at a faster rate than what insurers pay.

James DeWolf Perry has been named executive director of the Center for Reconciliation, the Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island’s initiative to locate a slavery museum and inter-racial reconciliation center at the former Cathedral of St. John in Providence.