News

Katherine Doherty

Gov. Gina Raimondo sat down with high school students Tuesday at Providence's Central High Schoolto hear about their experiences taking college courses through a state program known as PrepareRI.

The program, which covers the cost of college courses for public school students, has been touted by Raimondo and others as a way to encourage more students to attend college. It's also seen as a way to give students a discount on the cost of college by allowing them to arrive on campus with credits already under their belts.

John Bender / RIPR

City officials in Providence are considering an ordinance aimed at racial profiling by the police. The measure is known as the Community Safety Act. And advocates say it’s needed to address discrimination against minorities, especially in heavily policed neighborhoods. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here's what's happening in health care in Rhode Island:

UNINSURED:

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Former Red Sox star Curt Schilling and three other former 38 Studios executives have reached a preliminary $2.5 million settlement with the State of Rhode Island over the failure of the video-game company in 2012.

September has turned into the sweetest month this year, and here’s why.

THE RED SOX

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Green Party Candidate Jill Stein is making the rounds at colleges in southern New England this week.

Kristin Gourlay

U.S. Attorney Peter Neronha will hold a series of town hall meetings about the growing public health crisis of opioid addiction and overdose. The programs kick of today as part of National Heroin and Opioid Awareness week. 

Tuesday's (predictably) low-turnout primary (surprisingly) punched above its weight in offering a lot of grist for the political mill. So let's get right to it, after the obligatory reminder that your tips and comments are welcome, and that you can follow me through the week on the twitters.

RIPR FILE

Economic inequity has become a touchstone of our times. This week, NPR and the University of Rhode Island both kickoff dialogues on income inequality.

Last week brought a glimmer of good economic news to a state and nation that have grown all too used to doom and doldrums. 

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave speak with Scott Wolf, executive director of the nonprofit Grow Smart Rhode Island, about the future of the 6/10 Connector.

Governor Gina Raimondo has accelerated plans to repair the highway due to safety concerns. But Wolf says there is still time to consider alternatives, including a modified boulevard concept favored by some community groups and transit advocates.

When to listen:

Ian Donnis / RIPR

A recount by the state Board of Elections Friday morning showed that first-time candidate Marcia Ranglin-Vassell beat House Majority Leader John DeSimone by 21 votes, rather than her initial margin of 17.

The Elections Board attributed the change to the inclusion of provisional ballots. The final tally was 682-661.

Ranglin-Vassell surprised Rhode Island's political community by upsetting DeSimone, a 24-year incumbent, earlier this week.

Kathleen Masterson / Vermont Public Radio

Renewable energy has grown to nearly 10 percent of New England's energy mix. But here’s the problem: we can't control when the sun shines and the wind blows. That means sometimes extra renewable energy gets dumped, or a wind plant is told to power down.

State Rep. Mike Chippendale (R-Foster) joins Bonus Q&A to discuss 38 Studios, the impact of future tolls on fall elections, and a host of other legislative issues.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

State Rep. Michael Chippendale (R-Foster) joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss Tuesday's primary results, the outlook for the state GOP, and the upset involving House Majority Leader John DeSimone.

  In bad news for the Rhode Island economy, the unemployment rate inched up to 5.6 percent in August  from 5.5 percent in July and the Ocean State-based jobs dropped by 700, according to data released today by the R.I. Department of Labor and Training.

The state jobless rate was higher than the national unemployment rate, which stood at 4.9 percent. The DLT also said the data shows that the July job losses, the state has about 5,800 more jobs than at this time last year.

Pages