News

John Bender / RIPR

A Providence police investigation of the August 24th accident in which a Peter Pan bus driver hit and killed a Cumberland woman in Kennedy Plaza has resulted in no criminal charges against driver Matthew Reidy of Taunton, Mass.

Michelle Cagnon, 30, of Cumberland was struck by a bus operated by Reidy as she was walking on Washington St. in Kennedy Plaza.  She died as a result of the accident and was pronounced dead at the scene. The decision against criminal charges came after what police called “an extensive” investigation and reconstruction of the events that led to her death.

RIPR file photo

Providence city officials plan to create a "day center" where homeless and others in need can seek assistance. Mayor Jorge Elorza made the announcement Thursday, as the city seeks to address complaints about panhandling and drug use in downtown.

“The issues we are addressing today are not unique to Providence," Elorza said. "They are complex and multifaceted, but by coming together as community, we have the opportunity to make lasting change."

Mark Turek/Trinity Rep

Trinity Rep opens the theater season with a musical called "Beowolf. A Thousand Years of Baggage." Rhode Island Public Radio Theater Critic Bill Gale says "baggage" is not the word he would use, but whip-smart theater filled with great rock music and talented performers pretty much sums it up.

NOAA OKEANOS EXPLORER PROGRAM / 2013 NORTHEAST U.S. CANYONS EXPEDITION

This morning President Barack Obama announced he's protecting nearly 5,000 square miles of marine ecosystems in the Atlantic Ocean. He calls his decision a necessary step to help our oceans bounce back from the negative effects of climate change.

John Bender / RIPR

More than 100 supporters gathered at Providence City Hall Wednesday evening for the first public hearing on a proposed ordinance known as the Community Safety Act.

The CSA seeks to reduce potential racial profiling by city law enforcement.

The ordinance includes 12 central points, several of which are variations on state law and the current the Providence police code of conduct. Most expand the definition of racial profiling and procedures for handling police stops, said community organizer Vanessa Flores-Maldonando.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island health officials estimate nearly 20,000 Rhode Islanders are addicted to opioids – whether prescription painkillers or heroin. But only a few thousand are receiving something called “medication assisted treatment.” 

Fred Bever / Maine Public Broadcasting News

A major transformation in the way energy is made, delivered and used is happening right now, and it’s disrupting the traditional business model of electric utility companies. That model includes building big infrastructure projects to transmit electricity.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Rewind

Sep 14, 2016

  In A.A. Milne's classic children's story Winnie the Pooh, the beloved anthropomorphic bear asks Piglet, "What day is it?"  "It's today," squeaked Piglet.  "My favorite day," Pooh replied.  Pooh's profound message, it seems, is that it's so important for us to appreciate the moment we're in -- a moment that won't last forever -- despite whatever wishes we might have to hold tight to the most precious events in our lives.  And we hear compelling echoes of that very wise insight from Rabbi Sarah Mack.

 

Rabbi Sarah Mack, a native of Seattle, Washington, is a member of the clergy at Temple Beth-El in Providence. 

Political newcomer Jason Knight defeated veteran State Rep. Jan Malik in the District 67 Democratic primary by winning a huge victory in the two Barrington precincts, even as Knight lost the two polling places in Malik’s Warren stronghold.

RIPR file photo

By 2025, 75 percent of Rhode Island's third graders will be "proficient or better" in reading, according to the goal announced Wednesday by Gov. Gina Raimondo. In setting the target, Raimondo cited evidence that suggests third grade reading is a strong indicator of future success in school.

"Today, I'm drawing a line in the sand and setting a clear goal for Rhode Island: By 2025, when the kids who were born this year reach third grade, three out of four will be reading at grade level," Raimondo said in a prepared statement.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A series of hearings about the state of mental health care kicks off Thursday at the Statehouse. Lawmakers are concerned about gaps in the system.

Cranston Senator Josh Miller says he hopes to hold at least four hearings about mental health services in Rhode Island.

“And we hope to hear from providers and patients about the needs that aren’t being met, where those needs are, and what we can do either legislatively or departmentally to better meet some of those needs.”

Elisabeth Harrison

In Tuesday's primary, Rhode Island voters ousted House Majority Leader John DeSimone and five other incumbents. Progressive Democrats picked up three wins, and mayors in North Providence and Woonsocket won re-election. Rhode Island Public Radio's Political Analyst Scott MacKay discusses these results and more with Host Chuck Hinman.

  Average rental costs went up by about 5.6 percent last year, according new data from HousingWorks, a housing research group at Roger Williams University.

The group’s annual survey was released Wednesday. It finds the average two-bedroom apartment costs a little more than $1,200 a month in Rhode Island.

HousingWorks says roughly half of renters have to spend more than 30 percent of their income to cover the rent. Director Brenda Clements says the lack of supply of affordable rentals is a persistent problem in the state.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Wind power is about to go big-time in New England, with the opening of the first offshore wind farm in the U.S., located off the Rhode Island coast. And onshore wind projects already dot the region. But Connecticut hasn’t joined the movement. The state doesn’t have a lot of wind, or available space, and only recently lifted a ban on wind turbine projects.

As part of the New England News Collaborative energy series, The Big Switch, WNPR’s Ryan Caron King goes to the tiny town of Colebrook, Connecticut to find out why wind power hasn’t taken off yet, and whether another natural resource - water reservoirs - might be the solution.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The Town of Burrillville is asking the state Energy Facility Siting Board to dismiss Invenergy’s application on grounds that the application is incomplete.

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