News

Janet Graham / Creative Commons License

The invasive moths are native to Europe and first appeared in New England around 2004. The females lay their eggs between Thanksgiving and the New Year, and their offspring can cause extensive damage to foliage when they hatch as caterpillars in the spring.

Heather Faubert, a research associate at the University of Rhode Island, said so far there’s only one real way to deal with winter months.  

State Rep-elect Ken Mendonca joins Bonus Q&A to discuss his top legislative goal, why truck tolls were not influential as an election issue, whether President-elect Trump should do more to repudiate hate groups, and more.

Yale Art Gallery

For November's Artscape, we visited New Haven, Connecticut, where an exhibit at the Yale University Art Gallery showcases the dramatic artistry of furniture making in colonial-era Rhode Island. Rhode Island Public Radio's Chuck Hinman talked with the gallery's Curator of American Decorative Arts, Patricia Kane, about Art & Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650-1830.

Alex Braunstein / RIPR

What if you could only eat food grown within a few miles of your home for the next ten days? For most of us, that would mean no bread, no coffee, and no olive oil. A group of 57 Aquidneck Island residents decided to take on the challenge, and Rhode Island Public Radio’s Alex Braunstein joined one of them for lunch at her home in Newport.

RI State Archives / Public Domain

An array of photos and documents now on display at the State Archives chronicles the history of indigenous peoples in Rhode Island.  The area was once home to several Native American tribes, including the Wompanoag and the Narragansett.

The exhibit features early deeds between colonists and the tribes living in the area. One of the deeds gave Aquidneck Island to Roger Williams in a deal with the Narragansett Nation.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

This Thanksgiving many of us are gathering with family – some of whom we haven’t seen for a while. If that includes older relatives and friends, you might notice some changes. But which changes are part of the normal aging process, and which might indicate there’s a problem? 

Courtesy of INSPIRE Environmental

Fishermen and scientists are trying to understand how the Block Island Wind Farm may affect fish in Rhode Island waters. This week Rhode Island Public Radio’s Ambar Espinoza reported on what we know and don't know yet about the impact of the offshore wind farm on fisheries. She joined Rhode Island Public Radio News Director Elisabeth Harrison for an update on acoustics, marine mammals and wildlife habitats.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

State Police say an allegation of voter intimidation in a high-profile legislative race is unfounded.

The accusation of voter intimidation came up in Republican Steven Frias’ challenge to House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello. One voter, Larry Winkler, said the person who came to collect his mail ballot questioned why he was picking Frias, but still submitted the ballot.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island’s Department of Human Services has submitted its corrective action plan to the U.S. Food and Nutrition Service. That’s what the federal agency required when it discovered a number of problems with Rhode Island’s new online benefits system, UHIP.

Excessive wait times and overcrowding in DHS field offices. Computer glitches. A lack of staff training on the new system. The problems got so bad with the state’s new system for food stamps and other benefits that the federal agency asked them to draw up an emergency plan to fix the problems.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo is responding to Monday statehouse demonstration, where more than 100 peopled called for state lawmakers to pledge action against some of the President-elect’s campaign promises. The group known as “Resist Hate RI” delivered a letter Raimondo.

In the letter, the progressive group demands that the Governor, Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed, and House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello, protect rights they see as threatened by Donald Trump’s administration. Governor Raimondo responded with a lengthy post on social media.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

There have been anecdotal reports about a rise in hate crimes around the country since the presidential election. But it remains unclear whether there’s been a similar uptick in Rhode Island. That's because the state has no centralized mechanism for reporting suspected hate crimes.

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin's office says the only way to find out would be to survey local police departments.

RIPR FILE

A new report on homeless youth in Rhode Island found at least 172 people between the ages of 18 and 24 using emergency shelters in 2015. The report comes from nonprofit Crossroads, a homeless services provider. Crossroads Director Karen Santilli said it’s difficult to track homeless young people.

“They are couch surfing, they are hanging out with friends, they’re finding places to stay in encampments, that are out, off the shelter system,” said Santilli. “So the fact that 172 came into the shelter system is high, but we know the numbers are higher than that.”

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

If you’re hitting the road this Thanksgiving holiday prepare for some company on the interstate, a lot of it. Nearly 50-million people are expected to travel through the weekend. That’s an uptick of nearly 2 percent in the amount of travelers from last Thanksgiving, according to AAA, and the highest number since 2007. The vast majority will hit the road says AAA Northeast spokesman John Paul

Those of us who are raising daughters in this modern era perhaps take it for granted that they have as much opportunity as their male counterparts to enroll in college and reach for the educational stars.  This wasn't always the case, of course, but today no thoughtful American would imagine denying women equal access.  Sadly, in many parts of the world girls and women continue to face insurmountable barriers.  Indeed, some courageous women have challenged the daunting obstacles they face and, along the way, paid a very steep price.

Elisabeth Harrison

After a contentious presidential campaign, many communities -- and even families -- remain divided over the election of Republican Donald Trump. That’s been a challenge for churches, synagogues and other places of worship, where people with strong feelings may sit side-by-side each week.

Pages