NPR News

The Iraqi military and its allies have been pushing for a week toward the city of Mosul, held by the Islamic State. For people fleeing the fighting, a few thousand so far, it's been an unbelievably frightening seven days.

In the Debaga camp for displaced people, about 50 miles southeast of Mosul, which is becoming more crowded, I sit with a family who tell me about leaving the village where they lived under ISIS more than two years.

There are few places in the country with more wind energy potential than Wyoming. But the state has seen almost no new wind turbines built in six years, even while wind has boomed in the rest of the country.

Depending on who you ask, the challenges have been political, technical or both. But now, the outlook is improving on all fronts. Wyoming Public Radio’s Stephanie Joyce reports.

The legalization of recreational marijuana in Colorado almost three years ago has given way to an industry of dispensaries, including Native Roots, the largest marijuana chain and license holder in the state.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson met with owner and CEO Josh Ginsberg about how he has seen the industry evolve, and the challenges he continues to face under burdensome regulations.

Remembering Activist And Author Tom Hayden

Oct 24, 2016

The author, journalist, politician and one of the organizers of the anti-war protests at the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago, died yesterday in California. He was 76.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young had a chance to speak with Hayden at the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia this summer. He had suffered a stroke and was in a wheelchair.

But while his body was failing him, his mind was not — Hayden was still speaking out. Today, we’re revisiting that conversation, which aired in July.

New research finds little lies pave the way for big ones.

It's one thing to appreciate a 20-year-old fine wine. It is something else to brew up a 2,500-year-old alcoholic beverage.

While sifting through the remains of an Iron Age burial plot dating from 400 to 450 B.C. in what is today Germany, Bettina Arnold, an archaeologist and anthropologist at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and others uncovered a cauldron that contained remnants of an alcohol brewed and buried with the deceased.

Adnan Syed, whose murder conviction was exhaustively explored in the first season of the hit podcast Serial, has asked a judge to release him on bail.

His lawyers said they filed the request in a Maryland court on Monday.

Syed is currently waiting to go to trial — again. This summer, a judge agreed that Syed's defense attorney had mishandled his case during his murder trial in 2000, and granted a new trial.

More than 35 million eligible voters in the U.S. — about one in six — have a disability. And in the last presidential election, almost a third of voters with disabilities reported having trouble casting their ballots — whether it was getting into the polling place, reading the ballot, or struggling with a machine.

Despite some improvements, many of these voters are expected to face similar problems again this year.

Say this about Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte: He's not boring. Last week, on a state visit to Beijing, he dropped a bombshell during a speech to Chinese and Philippine business leaders about Manila's longtime treaty ally, the United States:

"Your honors, in this venue, I announce my separation from the United States. Both in military, not maybe social, but economics also."

His Chinese hosts were delighted to hear it, of course. But when he got home on Saturday, he walked it back.

Comic Chris Gethard knows what it's like to feel hopeless and alone. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that he has experienced depression so severe that it led to suicidal thoughts. "I didn't like who I was," he says. "I spent a lot of my life regretting who I was, which is a sad thing to say."

Gethard relives some of his darkest moments in the one-man show, Career Suicide, which is billed as "a new comedy about suicide, depression, alcoholism, and all the other funniest parts of life."

Oxford University Press has announced that its new edition of the complete works of William Shakespeare will credit Christopher Marlowe as a co-author on the three Henry VI plays.

Despite years of controversy about the authorship of some of Shakespeare's work, this is the first time a major publishing house has formally named Marlowe as a co-author.

AT&T's proposed $85.4 billion purchase of Time Warner is already raising eyebrows among an important constituency: politicians. Reaction to the deal, which was announced Saturday night, has been swift, and skeptical, from both sides of the aisle.

At a rally in Gettysburg, Pa., earlier Saturday, after news of the deal had started to trickle out, GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump said it was "a deal we will not approve in my administration because it's too much concentration of power in the hands of too few."

French security forces have started evicting the thousands of migrants living in a notorious camp known as "The Jungle" near the port of Calais.

Authorities intend to dismantle the squalid camp that, despite its poor living conditions, has housed thousands of people fleeing wars or poverty for a better life in Europe. Many hope to reach the U.K. — which lies just 26 miles away across the English Channel. Others are seeking asylum in France.

Every morning, after Dennis Ogbe wakes up and says his prayers, he performs a daily exercise routine.

He does this not only because he's a world-class athlete, but also because he'd like to be able to keep walking. Putting one foot in front of the other is a skill he has not taken for granted for decades — since doctors in his home country of Nigeria told his parents, when he was 3, that he was paralyzed from the waist down.

The reason?

He was infected with polio while in a hospital being treated for malaria.

The final presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton wrapped up last week, but a post-debate argument raged for days afterward: Is Trump saying "bigly" or "big-league"?

Many took to social media questioning what the Republican nominee could be saying.

Some even criticized him, saying bigly isn't a word.