Ambar Espinoza

Environmental Reporter

Ambar Espinoza’s roots in environmental journalism started in Rhode Island a few years ago as an environmental reporting fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting. She worked as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for a few years covering several beats, including the environment and changing demographics. Her journalism experience includes working as production and editorial assistant at National Public Radio, and as a researcher at APM’s Marketplace.

Espinoza joins Rhode Island Public Radio most recently from Seattle, WA, where she earned a master of education with a focus on science education from the University of Washington. She earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from American University in Washington, D.C. Espinoza was born in El Salvador and raised in Los Angeles, CA.

Ways to Connect

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

This year’s highest tides are predicted Friday and Saturday night during this month’s new moon. They’ll provide a glimpse of what daily high tides may look like in a future with higher sea levels.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The health of Southern New England's American lobster population remains a concern for fishermen, scientists and regulators. Ideas for how to help replenish lobsters are still making their way through a long process.

Screenshot of the Audubon Society of Rhode Island's Peregrine Falcon Webcam

The iconic Superman Building may be vacant, but it has no trouble attracting peregrine falcons. The skyscraper’s current residents welcomed four chicks this week.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

This week, Brown University is examining environmental issues related air with a series of events that mix art and science.

Ian Donnis

The city of Providence is projected to face a 37 million-dollar budget gap in 10 years if it doesn’t turn around its current budget problems. That’s according to a new report that analyzes the city’s finances. The report outlines the source of the city’s money problems, but it also offers ideas for how to reduce expenses and increase revenue.

Mayor Jorge Elorza says in the coming weeks and months, he’ll meet with different key stakeholders to discuss a series of short- and long-term solutions.

RIPR File Photo

Immigration consistently ranks as the number one issue in national surveys of Latino voters, such as surveys by Latino Decisions and Univision News. But education and the economy are not far behind. As part of our RhodyVotes '16 coverage, we talked to some Latino voters about what's driving them to the polls. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Yesterday at Brown University, U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz spoke at a roundtable focused on clean energy and climate change. He talked about Mission Innovation, a global commitment by the United States and 19 other countries to double investments in developing clean energy technologies.

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Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Environmental officials in Massachusetts are trying to restore an endangered population of native rattlesnakes. The Roger Williams Park Zoo in Providence is helping out with the project.

Courtesy of Michael Smith

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is widely expected to win Rhode Island later this month. But some local Republicans are not happy with the idea of Trump as their nominee.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Historic places all over the world face the challenge of rising seas as a result of climate change. Preservationists have convened in Newport this week to talk about how to protect these treasured places.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Word-game enthusiasts may be familiar with Bananagrams. Created by a Rhode Island family, it's kind of like Scrabble, but without a board. 

RI Department of Environmental Management

The freshwater fishing season has officially begun. More than 100 waterways across the state have been stocked with trout.

Darlingtrk / Wikimedia Commons

The head of the National Science Foundation visits the Ocean State today. She’ll meet with researchers, scientists and educators throughout the state.

National Science Foundation Director France Córdova will stop by Brown University, the Rhode Island School of Design, and the University of Rhode Island to meet with the state’s top scientists.

U.S. Sen. Jack Reed is hosting Córdova for the day to show her some of the groundbreaking research happening in the state.

Courtesy of the Rhode Island General Assembly

Two elected officials representing Burrillville are asking state regulators to deny approving a proposed power plant in their town. 

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