Ambar Espinoza

Environmental Reporter

Ambar Espinoza’s roots in environmental journalism started in Rhode Island a few years ago as an environmental reporting fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting. She worked as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for a few years covering several beats, including the environment and changing demographics. Her journalism experience includes working as production and editorial assistant at National Public Radio, and as a researcher at APM’s Marketplace.

Espinoza joins Rhode Island Public Radio most recently from Seattle, WA, where she earned a master of education with a focus on science education from the University of Washington. She earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from American University in Washington, D.C. Espinoza was born in El Salvador and raised in Los Angeles, CA.

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RI News
6:54 am
Tue May 5, 2015

Twin River Offers Timeline, But Few Details On Proposed Tiverton Gaming Facility

John Taylor, chairman of the Twin River management group's board, brought a set of maps that show the site the company secured in Tiverton to build a new gaming facility.
Ambar Espinoza RIPR

The parent company of Twin River presented few details to the Tiverton town council regarding its plans to move Newport Grand’s gaming license to Tiverton.

“Tonight we’re here with a clean slate,” said John Taylor, chairman of the Twin River management group's board, said at a town council meeting last night. He brought a set of maps that showed the site the company secured in Tiverton, about 400 feet from the Massachusetts border.

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Environment
9:14 am
Sun May 3, 2015

RISD/Brown/Erfurt Solar House Is At Home In France

The Techstyle Haus, the solar house designed and constructed by a team of students from RISD, Brown, and a university in Germany, is now permanently situated at an art academy in France.
Photo Courtesy of Edouard Dupont-Madinier

An art academy in France, Domaine de Boisbuchet, now has a solar-powered building designed by students from Brown University, the Rhode Island School of Design, and the University of Applied Sciences in Erfurt, Germany. The house was part of an international solar competition last year.

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Environment
8:58 am
Fri May 1, 2015

Providence and South Counties Receive An 'F' For Air Quality

The American Lung Association has given RI an 'F' for air quality.
Credit thisisbossi / flickr

Hot days last summer triggered high levels of smog pollution across the state, especially in Providence. 

The city earned an F in this year’s State of the Air report, issued by the American Lung Association. Karina Holyoak Wood is the organization’s public policy director in Rhode Island. She said tens of thousands of Rhode Islanders have chronic lung problems, including asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema.

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Environment
6:33 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Wastewater Agency Wrestles With Cost Of Water Quality Project

The board of the Narragansett Bay Commission considered several options to move forward with the final phase of its federally-mandated water quality project, all of them costly. The option they voted for will cost approximately $815 million.
Courtesy of Narragansett Bay Commission

The board of the Narragansett Bay Commission has voted to move forward with the final phase of a water quality project designed to overhaul its old sewer systems. The wastewater agency is struggling with how much it will cost to complete the project, aimed at further improving water quality in Narragansett Bay.

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Environment
4:03 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Wastewater Agency Moves Foward With Next Step Of Water Quality Project

The Narragansett Bay Commission’s third and final phase of a multi-year water quality project will cost about $815 million, if state and federal regulators approve the plan. This final phase could bring the project's total cost to about $1.5 billion.

The project, known as the combined sewer overflow (CSO) project, involves installing a large tunnel that would run through Pawtucket, Central Falls and the northern part of East Providence. The tunnel would stop untreated sewage and stormwater from overflowing into Narragansett Bay during heavy rainstorms.

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