Ambar Espinoza

Environmental Reporter

Ambar Espinoza’s roots in environmental journalism started in Rhode Island a few years ago as an environmental reporting fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting. She worked as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for a few years covering several beats, including the environment and changing demographics. Her journalism experience includes working as production and editorial assistant at National Public Radio, and as a researcher at APM’s Marketplace.

Espinoza joins Rhode Island Public Radio most recently from Seattle, WA, where she earned a master of education with a focus on science education from the University of Washington. She earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from American University in Washington, D.C. Espinoza was born in El Salvador and raised in Los Angeles, CA.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of James Head / Brown University

Geoscientists from Brown University are part of a team at NASA looking for good places for humans to explore on the planet Mars, the most Earth-like planet in the solar system.  

RIPR File Photo

The Narragansett Bay Commission reports savings of $1.1 million a year thanks to a trio of wind turbines at the agency’s Field’s Point facility in Providence. Because of those energy savings, the agency wants to get up to 80 percent of its power from renewable sources.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Block Island has been dubbed one of “the last great places” in the western hemisphere. It has a shoreline largely untouched by development. But on the northwest corner of island, storms have been washing away at the bluffs, unearthing what used to be the island’s landfill.

RIPR File Photo

Global leaders in Paris over the weekend approved a historic international agreement to slow the warming of the planet. Here at home, the Rhode Island federal delegation is praising the climate accord, calling it a victory for the planet and future generations. Local environmental advocates and climate change experts say they are proud of programs New England has initiated to reduce acid rain and carbon emissions from power plants. Now they’re hopeful the Paris Climate Pact will steer the region away from natural gas.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

A new house in Matunuck will sustain winds of more than 130 miles per hour. It’s the first home under construction in New England built to disaster certification standards known as FORTIFIED.

After a string of severe storms in recent years, the state hopes to shift to a more rigorous building code so that homes can sustain high winds and water damage.

Photo courtesy of Peter Green

Over the next five years, dozens of volunteers will comb the Ocean State to map bird distribution. The data will be part of the state’s second bird breeding atlas, a joint undertaking by state and federal officials in partnership with the University of Rhode Island.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The Environment Council of Rhode Island is hosting a nature video festival early next year to showcase the state’s natural wonders.

RIPR FILE

Rhode Island government agencies are among the state’s top energy consumers, spending about $35 million a year on energy bills.

Gov. Gina Raimondo signed an executive order to reduce that energy consumption. She’s committing state agencies to get 100 percent of its power from renewable sources by 2025 and to reduce energy consumption by 10 percent by 2019.

Aaron Read

Foreign ministers in Paris have a tough week ahead as they tackle the first draft of a global agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But local observers are still encouraged by positive signs in the climate negotiations.

RIPR File Photo

Since 2001, wind power in the United States has steadily offset carbon pollution. How much? More than a year’s worth of Canada’s emissions.

In a new report by Environment America, New England advocates of renewable energy are pointing to that as evidence of the growing role wind energy could continue to play in combating the climate crisis.

Eight climate activists who were arrested for trespassing at the Spectra Energy facility in Burrillville have been released. They’re facing charges of criminal trespass.

Rhode Island Public Radio

This week in Paris, world leaders launched a major climate change summit. The two-week meeting is aimed at negotiating an agreement to reduce carbon emissions. A group of Brown University professors and students is also at the summit. Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza spoke with the group to hear what the next two weeks have in store.  

U.S. Department of Agriculture

At the end of a filling Thanksgiving feast, you might be wondering: what on earth should I do with this big turkey skeleton with bits of meat all over it? You could compost it instead of sending it to the landfill. But it’s a lot of work to do it right. One local man is making it really easy to compost.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving, and like most of us, the men at the maximum-security prison in Cranston will sit down to a Thanksgiving meal. Their turkey and stuffing will be seasoned with herbs harvested from their prison garden. 

Courtesy of Isabel Burnham / Norman Bird Sanctuary

The Norman Bird Sanctuary in Middletown boasts beautiful views of its 325-acre property year-round. Now people with wheelchairs, walkers, and baby strollers will be able to enjoy the wildlife sanctuary with greater ease. The wildlife sanctuary unveiled its first accessible trail this week.

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