Ambar Espinoza

Environmental Reporter

Ambar Espinoza’s roots in environmental journalism started in Rhode Island a few years ago as an environmental reporting fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting. She worked as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for a few years covering several beats, including the environment and changing demographics. Her journalism experience includes working as production and editorial assistant at National Public Radio, and as a researcher at APM’s Marketplace.

Espinoza joins Rhode Island Public Radio most recently from Seattle, WA, where she earned a master of education with a focus on science education from the University of Washington. She earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from American University in Washington, D.C. Espinoza was born in El Salvador and raised in Los Angeles, CA.

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RI News
8:18 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Local Construction Of Block Island Wind Farm To Start Soon

Wind turbines installed at the Port of Providence, similar turbines are set to be installed at an offshore wind farm near Block Island.
Credit RIPR FILE

Gov. Gina Raimondo and members of the Rhode Island Congressional delegation will meet with Deepwater Wind in Quonset Point today to announce local jobs associated with the construction of the Block Island Wind Farm. They'll also provide an outlook for growing this new industry in the state. 

They’ll tour Specialty Diving Services, where local welders are working on some of the components for the wind farm’s foundation. This local company is working as a sub-contractor for a company in Louisiana that is leading the construction of the wind farm’s steel jacket foundations. 

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Environment
8:12 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Board Of Narragansett Bay Commission To Review Options For Sewer Overflow Project

The board of the Narragansett Bay Commission will vote tomorrow on how to approach the third and final phase of the Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) project. That project aims to reduce the amount of untreated sewage and polluted runoff entering Narragansett Bay and its tributaries. The board will discuss three options at a meeting tonight.

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Environment
10:07 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Environmental Advocates Push Back On Expanding Region's Natural Gas Capacity

Five New England governors met yesterday in Hartford, Connecticut, to talk about increasing the region’s energy supply. No solutions are set in stone, but environmental advocates are concerned proposals rely too heavily on natural gas.

Gov. Gina Raimondo said this winter New England’s average wholesale electricity prices were significantly higher than neighboring regions. And those high prices are tough on consumers and businesses. Raimondo said at the regional meeting, the governors committed to provide relief.

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Environment
8:46 am
Thu April 23, 2015

State Sets Aside Money For Energy Efficient Streetlights

Light emitting diodes (LED) are the latest in energy efficient lighting technology. Marion Gold, commissioner of the state Office of Energy Resources, said LED lights produce hues more true to actual colors, rather than the yellow hues from standard streetlights.
Credit meltedplastic via Creative Common License

A new pool of money is available for cities and towns looking to reduce their energy use and costs. The state is setting aside more than $500,000 to retrofit existing streetlights to more energy-efficient ones with light-emitting diode (LED) technology.

Marion Gold, commissioner at the Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources, said streetlights are one of the biggest expenses in a municipality’s energy budget.

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Environment
5:00 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Rising Tide: Little Compton Farm Bucks Recession Trend

Skip Paul in his spinach house at Wishing Stone Farm. Most of what he grows on his farm is organic.
Ambar Espinoza RIPR

This story is part of our series “Rising Tide” about how – or whether - Rhode Islanders are emerging from the deepest economic recession since the 1930s. The question we’re asking is: Does a rising tide really lift all boats, or are some Rhode Islanders still being left behind?

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