Ambar Espinoza

Environmental Reporter

Ambar Espinoza’s roots in environmental journalism started in Rhode Island a few years ago as an environmental reporting fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting. She worked as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for a few years covering several beats, including the environment and changing demographics. Her journalism experience includes working as production and editorial assistant at National Public Radio, and as a researcher at APM’s Marketplace.

Espinoza joins Rhode Island Public Radio most recently from Seattle, WA, where she earned a master of education with a focus on science education from the University of Washington. She earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from American University in Washington, D.C. Espinoza was born in El Salvador and raised in Los Angeles, CA.

Ways to Connect

Darlingtrk / Wikimedia Commons

The head of the National Science Foundation visits the Ocean State today. She’ll meet with researchers, scientists and educators throughout the state.

National Science Foundation Director France Córdova will stop by Brown University, the Rhode Island School of Design, and the University of Rhode Island to meet with the state’s top scientists.

U.S. Sen. Jack Reed is hosting Córdova for the day to show her some of the groundbreaking research happening in the state.

Courtesy of the Rhode Island General Assembly

Two elected officials representing Burrillville are asking state regulators to deny approving a proposed power plant in their town. 

RIPR File Photo

Minimizing damage from future floods will be the focus of a gathering today in Smithfield.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Driving and flying are known for having heavy carbon footprints. But sailing across oceans also contributes to environmental pollution. A two-day workshop in Narragansett will focus on how to make boats and ports more sustainable.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Nearly 800 people showed up for the first public hearing of a proposed power plant in Burrillville. The 900-megawatt facility would be the state’s largest power plant, if approved. 

RIPR FILE

  A Brown University professor and a climate expert is adding his voice in opposition to a power plant proposed in Burrillville.

J. Timmons Roberts filed written testimony on behalf of the Conservation Law Foundation, one of several groups participating in hearings for the proposed power plant. Roberts said the plant will make it impossible for Rhode Island to meet emission reduction goals outlined in the state’s climate change law.

Courtesy of Roger Williams University

In an effort to slow the effects of climate change, Roger Williams University is spearheading a tree-planting campaign. Trees can absorb and store rising concentrations of carbon dioxide, which are responsible for global warming.

The state board considering a proposal for a power plant in Burrillville holds its first public hearing tonight at 6 p.m. in the auditorium at Burrillville High School in Harrisville. The power plant has generated opposition from several local groups.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The new fishing year begins in May and federal regulators are seeking public comments for proposed catch limits for the region’s groundfish industry. The proposed regulations, particularly for Georges Bank cod, have southern New England fishermen worried.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Dozens of ProvPort workers have started to assemble parts for the towers that will make up the Block Island Wind Farm. State officials will tour the manufacturing facility Friday to take a look at the work underway.

Construction work in the ocean ended last fall, but work continues indoor this spring at a temporary manufacturing facility set up by Deepwater Wind and General Electric.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Many of Rhode Island’s 18th century buildings have survived a number of coastal storms in the past: the Great September Gale of 1815, the 1938 Hurricane, and most recently Superstorm Sandy. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Rhode Island’s aquaculture industry grew by 7 percent last year despite icy conditions in coastal waters.

Frozen coastal ponds meant individual growers harvested less shellfish than the previous year, according to David Beutel, aquaculture coordinator with the state Coastal Resources Management Council.

“However because in 2015 we had more growers than we had the year before, overall the state's production was up,” said Beutel. “It did balance out for an overall increase.”

The demand for oysters is driving that overall growth, he said.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

An estimated 20 percent of the trash that ends up in landfills is food. One way to reduce food waste is to compost your kitchen scraps. 

Courtesy of Narragansett Bay Commission

Scientists at the Narragansett Bay Commission are getting a new building at the Field’s Point campus. That’s where the wastewater agency will house labs with the latest technology.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

It's been months since the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission released its latest report on how lobsters are faring in the Atlantic Coast. But it’s still a hot topic among fishermen in the Ocean State.

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