Ambar Espinoza

Environmental Reporter

Ambar Espinoza’s roots in environmental journalism started in Rhode Island a few years ago as an environmental reporting fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting. She worked as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for a few years covering several beats, including the environment and changing demographics. Her journalism experience includes working as production and editorial assistant at National Public Radio, and as a researcher at APM’s Marketplace.

Espinoza joins Rhode Island Public Radio most recently from Seattle, WA, where she earned a master of education with a focus on science education from the University of Washington. She earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from American University in Washington, D.C. Espinoza was born in El Salvador and raised in Los Angeles, CA.

Ways to Connect

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The nonprofit that operates New England’s energy grid and wholesale energy market purchased power this week from two Rhode Island energy projects: Deepwater Wind’s Block Island Wind Farm and Invenergy’s proposed power plant in Burrillville.

The offshore wind farm is scheduled to go online later this year, and the power plant has yet to gain approval from state officials.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Last night in his first State of the City address, Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza painted a positive outlook for the city, despite a cumulative deficit of more than $13 million and a long legal battle with the city’s firefighters.

sand dunes
Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Gov. Gina Raimondo’s proposed budget devotes about 1.1 percent of all state spending to the state’s two major environmental agencies: the Department of Environmental Management and the Coastal Resources Management Council. The DEM got a small bump from the governor’s last budget, while the CRMC held steady. We break down the numbers.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Over the course of three days, a team of experts from around the country helped Providence plan for the impacts of climate change through a grant-funded series of events called ResilientPVD Lab.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

A new bill that puts a tax on carbon has garnered broad support from environmental advocates, businesses, and religious groups. Supporters believe the bill, called Energize Rhode Island, will help reduce carbon emissions and stimulate the economy. 

Georgia Department of Natural Resources via NOAA Fisheries

NOAA Fisheries has expanded protected habitats for the North Atlantic right whales by more than sixfold, from about 4,500 nautical miles to nearly 30,000 nautical miles. The expansion includes feeding grounds here off the New England coast.

Photo Courtesy of the Newport Restoration Foundation

A new study shows that Newport could face steep economic losses due to rising seas and storm surge related to climate change. That’s because 17 percent of Newport’s buildings sit in a floodplain.

Courtesy of Bill Zinni / U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service is proposing a new national wildlife refuge in the Northeast. The refuge would include parts of Rhode Island and would protect native shrubs and small trees.

Over the past several decades, shrubs and young trees in the Northeast have been cleared for development or grown into mature forests. As those habitats have declined, scientists say so have more than 65 species of birds, mammals, reptiles, pollinating insects and other wildlife.

Courtesy of Dave McLaughlin / Clean Ocean Access

Illegally dumping trash on beaches is still a problem, despite city and town ordinances that forbid littering on public roads and public lands, according to advocates with Clean Ocean Access.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

President Obama’s overhauled federal education law, known as the Every Student Succeeds Act, includes money for environmental education. This is the first time a federal education bill recognizes environmental literacy programs as part of a child’s “well-rounded” education. We explain what this means for Rhode Island.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Environmental advocacy groups and businesses have been finding common ground in recent years around an unlikely issue: stronger enforcement of environmental laws.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

An official with Chicago-based Invenergy said the company plans to submit information that was missing from a permit application related to the proposed power plant in Burrillville. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

2015 had no shortage of stories about the environment and energy, including the start of construction on Deepwater Wind’s Block Island Wind Farm. Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza spoke with Rhode Island Public Radio Morning Edition host Chuck Hinman about what’s in store for the environment in 2016.

The Rhode Island Energy Facility Siting Board has approved four parties, known as "intervenors," to participate in hearings for the proposal to build a power plant in Burrillville.

Those parties include the state’s Office of Energy Resources, National Grid, the Conservation Law Foundation and the Rhode Island Building and Construction Trades Council.

The EFSB is charged with overseeing the siting process for major energy facilities in the state.

Courtesy of Lauren Montieth / Brown University

A team at Brown University is working to uncover the history of green spaces in Providence.

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