Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for, and editing and producing stories for's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

During his eight years in office, he was admired for the way he steered West Germany through both an economic crisis and violent outbursts of terrorism. Former Chancellor Helmut Schmidt has died at his home in Hamburg at 96.

In response to the oil crisis of the early 1970s, Schmidt worked with French leaders to set into motion the monetary system that today unites the economies of the European Union. He also worked with both France and the U.S. to hold global economic summits.

Describing a sprawling criminal enterprise that includes at least 75 shell companies and the use of multiple fake identities, the Justice Department has indicted four men for hacking, securities fraud and a range of other crimes that involved hundreds of employees and accomplices.

Investigators say they believe the group "generated hundreds of millions of dollars in illicit proceeds."

One day after an investigating committee said Russia's athletics system is plagued with rampant and systematic doping problems, the World Anti-Doping Agency has suspended Russia's official sports drug-testing lab.

If you think it's too early for Christmas ads, you're not alone. But the new seasonal spot from British retailer John Lewis is something of a sensation, with nearly 12 million people having watched the tear-jerking video since Thursday.

The head of Egypt's commission investigating last week's crash of a Russian airliner says the jet broke apart in the air, 23 minutes and 14 seconds after taking off from Sharm el-Sheikh's airport. But Ayman al-Muqaddam also says parts of the wreckage are still missing, and that it's still too soon to determine a cause for the crash.

More than 15 years after he was convicted of murdering his ex-girlfriend, Adnan Syed has been granted a hearing to let his lawyers present a possible alibi and questions about cellphone data. Attorneys for Syed, the key figure in the popular podcast Serial, also want to probe "alleged prosecutorial misconduct."

With 42 days having passed since the last negative blood test from an Ebola patient in Sierra Leone, the World Health Organization has declared the deadly virus is no longer being transmitted in the country. Ebola killed more than 3,500 people in Sierra Leone's outbreak that began in May of 2014.

Marking the occasion Saturday, Dr. Anders Nordström of the WHO says that in Sierra Leone, "8,704 people were infected and 3,589 have died, 221 of them healthcare workers, all of whom we remember on this day."

Ending a process that has lingered for much of his time in the Oval Office, President Obama announced Friday that the U.S. has rejected TransCanada's application for a permit to complete the Keystone XL pipeline.

A region of southeastern Brazil is struggling to cope with a devastating flood, after two dams broke outside an iron ore mine and sent mineral waste and thick red mud over a large valley.

In a jobs report that may influence the Federal Reserve's decision on interest rates, the Labor Department says that 271,000 jobs were added in October. The unemployment rate fell slightly to 5 percent, according to the report from the agency's Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Two days after all flights between Britain and Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, were suspended, the first of some 20,000 British tourists who were stranded at the Red Sea resort are on their way home. Egyptian officials are restricting the number of flights, after initially canceling all of them, according to U.K. carrier EasyJet.

At first, it was just a bidding war. Then it was more like an actual war, with rival groups drawing blood after an auction of a coveted license plate number in China. The reasons behind the brawl are complex, from a preference for the number 9 to a broader power struggle.

The violence broke out in Huzhou, Zhejiang province, during a public auction of license plate number ED999 – an auspicious number for which one bidder was willing to pay "the jaw-dropping price" of 990,000 yuan (more than $150,000), according to The Shanghaiist, which published a video of the recent dispute.

In adopting a six-year transportation bill to fund highway and transit projects Thursday, the House also approved the revival of the Export-Import Bank, which has been idle since its charter expired in June.

A similar bill has already been approved by the Senate, including a provision that renews the Ex-Im Bank's charter. Before the legislation goes to President Obama, the two chambers will have to iron out differences between the two bills.

The political tempest that has for months swirled around Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane will touch down in a courtroom Thursday, when Kane is questioned about her allegations that a judge leaked sealed documents about the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse case.

In a decision that could open the door to legalizing marijuana in Mexico, that country's supreme court said Wednesday that four plaintiffs should be allowed to grow marijuana for their own use. The four belong to a nonprofit group that hopes to weaken the influence of drug cartels.