Elisabeth Harrison

News Director

Elisabeth Harrison's journalism background includes everything from behind-the-scenes work with the CBS Evening News to freelance documentary production.

She joined the WRNI team in 2007 as a Morning Edition producer and freelance journalist. In 2009, she became a full-time reporter, and became the Morning Edition host in 2011.  She was promoted to full-time News Director in June of 2015.

Harrison's education is as wide ranging as her work at Rhode Island Public Radio. She has a B.A. in English and French from Wellesley College, and a joint M.A. in Journalism and French Studies from NYU.

A native of Los Angeles, Harrison loves good food and good movies.

Ways To Connect

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Three senior transportation officials have been placed on administrative leave, but it has nothing to do with the sudden closure of the Park Avenue Bridge in Cranston, according to Governor Gina Raimondo.

Rhode Island’s ranking for child well-being has dropped from last year, according to a new report from the child advocacy group Kids Count. 

Rhode Island General Treasurer Seth Magaziner is weighing in on the legal challenge to the settlement over the state pension overhaul, whether he is considering a run for the governor’s office, and more.

Magaziner sat down with Rhode Island Public Radio News Director Elisabeth Harrison and RIPR Political Analyst Scott MacKay.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

The uphill battle to improve Rhode Island's economy, an appeal of the state pension settlement, and the mysterious explosion on Salty Brine Beach. That's all part of the conversation this week on Political Roundtable.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison hosts; Ian Donnis is away. We're joined, as always, by URI political science professor Maureen Moakley and RIPR's political analyst Scott MacKay.

RIPR File Photo

Sen. Jack Reed has not decided whether he supports President Barack Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran. On the one hand, Reed calls the agreement historic. On the other hand, he points out that failure would mean nuclear capabilities for Iran, which could spread to neighboring countries.

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