Elisabeth Harrison

News Director

Elisabeth Harrison's journalism background includes everything from behind-the-scenes work with the CBS Evening News to freelance documentary production.

She joined the WRNI team in 2007 as a Morning Edition producer and freelance journalist. In 2009, she became a full-time reporter, and became the Morning Edition host in 2011.  She was promoted to full-time News Director in June of 2015.

Harrison's education is as wide ranging as her work at Rhode Island Public Radio. She has a B.A. in English and French from Wellesley College, and a joint M.A. in Journalism and French Studies from NYU.

A native of Los Angeles, Harrison loves good food and good movies.

Ways to Connect

Rosaline Stock/Creative Commons License

Public schools will seek to close achievement gaps in 3rd grade reading and mathematics by 2025, under a bill signed into law this week by Gov. Gina Raimondo.

The measure provides no specifics on how to close those gaps, but directs the state board overseeing K-12 education adopt it as a goal. 

Elisabeth Harrison

Starting in 2018, state colleges and universities will have to meet specific performance goals to receive increases in state funding, under a state law signed by Governor Gina Raimondo on Thursday.

The goals include increasing the number of students graduating on-time and adding graduates in fields that employers need. 

RIPR FILE

As students enjoy the last few weeks of summer vacation, faculty at Rhode Island College are gearing up for a new semester and a new president. 

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2016

With summer nearing a close, we turn to the experts for book recommendations not to be missed on those final trips to the beach.

Rhode Island Public Radio's Elisabeth Harrison gets a few tips from Emma Ramadan and Tom Roberge, the owners of Riffraff, a new bookstore and bar opening this Fall in Providence.

Books you have to pick up right now

Emma Ramadan:  Ladivine, Marie NDiaye 

Courtesy of Brown University

Sovijja Pou, a senior at Brown University, will compete next week as one of two swimmers representing Cambodia. His event, the 100-meter freestyle, is scheduled for Tuesday.

Will Ricketson / U.S. Sailing Team Sperry

The Olympic Games began today in Rio de Janeiro, and five athletes competing for the United States have ties to Rhode Island. 

Elizabeth Beisel from Saunderstown will swim the 400 meter individual medley. She already won silver in the event four years ago in London, and took home a bronze medal in backstroke.

Elisabeth Harrison

In Middletown, St. George’s boarding school has announced a settlement with up to 30 former students, who allege they were sexually abused. 

Ian Donnis

State Police and Attorney General Peter Kilmartin will pursue no criminal charges after a years-long investigation into 38 Studios, the company that won a $75 million public subsidy to move to Rhode Island, then went bankrupt, leaving taxpayers on the hook.

In announcing results of the investigation, State  Police Col. Steven O'Donnell said a bad business deal doesn't necessarily provide grounds for a criminal indictment.

RIPR file photo

State Rep. John Carnevale has ended his campaign for re-election after a decision Thursday from the Providence Board of Canvassers, who ruled that Carnevale is not legally registered to vote in Providence.

The board found that Carnevale's primary residence is in Johnston, outside of the district he represents.

Carnevale thanked his constituents, saying it’s been an honor to serve them. But he said out of consideration for his family and his neighborhood, he would not seek re-election.

RI's First Female Governor On Historic Clinton Nomination

Jul 29, 2016
Marie Aberger

As Democrat Hillary Clinton was getting ready to shatter a glass ceiling Thursday as the first woman ever to accept a presidential nomination from a major U.S. political party, Governor Gina Raimondo was preparing to return home to watch Clinton's speech on television with her family.

Ian Donnis

Gov. Gina Raimondo is expected to sign a series of bills Wednesday that impact schools and children, including a bill requiring 20 minutes of recess per day in elementary schools.

Also on the list, a bill requiring public reporting on the deaths of children in the foster care system, dyslexia screenings in elementary schools, and a bill that authorizes the creation of a "bi-literacy" seal for bilingual high school graduates.

RIPR FILE

Education advocates say there’s a lot to like about the state’s new budget for public schools. That includes new funding for special education and early childhood education. But some advocates are concerned about the future of charter schools.

For more on that, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison spoke to Daniela Fairchild from the Rhode Island Campaign for Achievement Now, a group that advocates for charter schools and higher standards for all schools, among other issues.

Elisabeth Harrison

After announcing on Friday that 10th and 11th graders would be exempt from the state's annual standardized testing, education officials walked back the policy. The state Department of Education now says all students will have to take at least one standardized math test during high school, in either Algebra I, Algebra II or Geometry.

The state is reducing requirements for PARCC, the annual state test of English and Mathematics, in the hope that more students will take PSAT and SAT exams, which increases the likelihood of applying to college. 

taylor.a/creative commons license

The Rhode Island Department of Education has announced a new testing policy that should come as welcome news for many high school students. Under the new rules, 10th and 11th graders no longer have to take annual standardized tests of English and Mathematics.

Courtesy of Council on American Islamic Relations

A Muslim community center in Kingston was the target of vandalism, in what may be a response to an apparent terrorist attack in Nice, France.

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