Elisabeth Harrison

News Director

Elisabeth Harrison's journalism background includes everything from behind-the-scenes work with the CBS Evening News to freelance documentary production.

She joined the WRNI team in 2007 as a Morning Edition producer and freelance journalist. In 2009, she became a full-time reporter, and became the Morning Edition host in 2011.  She was promoted to full-time News Director in June of 2015.

Harrison's education is as wide ranging as her work at Rhode Island Public Radio. She has a B.A. in English and French from Wellesley College, and a joint M.A. in Journalism and French Studies from NYU.

A native of Los Angeles, Harrison loves good food and good movies.

Ways to Connect

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Test scores are due out this week for Rhode Island public school students who took the PARCC, a new standardized test linked to the Common Core standards for math and English. Rhode Island is part of a group of states that piloted the test last year.

Earlier this year millions of students took PARCC for real in about a dozen states. Roughly 75,000 students in Rhode Island took the test from 3rd grade to high school. Their scores will be the first glimpse at how the new test is working, and how Rhode Island compares to other states.

Alberto Hernandez/Creative Commons License

 Update:  The University of Rhode Island says it is in regular contact with study abroad programs to monitor the situation in Paris following a string of apparent terrorist attacks and maintain the safety of students. A total of 14 URI students were in Paris or other regions of France during the attacks on Friday night.

RIPR file photo

Ruggerio (D-Providence) joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss the ongoing debate over Governor Gina Raimondo's truck-toll plan; a new evaluation of ethics and accountability in state government; and the slow pace of progress in developing the I-195 Development District.

  

JWU Media Relations

Starting this month, Johnson & Wales students will have access to a full crime lab at the university’s criminal justice department. Work in the lab will be required for all students who major in criminal justice.

JWU spent some $650,000 outfitting a lab with the latest forensic microscopes and other technology so students can analyze fingerprints, blood spatter and other evidence. There’s also a re-enactment room, which Criminal Justice Department Chair Alison Goodrich likes to call “the murder room.”

Kristin Gourlay

Woonsocket-based CVS Health will lay off 150 workers, including 70 in Rhode Island. The pharmacy chain described the layoffs as part of an operational review aimed at boosting efficiency.

"CVS Health continually reviews its operations in all of its markets and facilities across the U.S. to enhance efficiencies and ensure the Company remains in the best competitive position to improve the health outcomes of its patients and clients while lowering their overall health costs," CVS Health spokesman Mike DiAngelis wrote in an email to Rhode Island Public Radio. 

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

In 1987, researchers in Finland began following tens of thousands of babies who were about to be born. In fact, they followed every child born in Finland that year, and they continue to follow them today. The study is known as the 1987 Finnish Birth Cohort Study. One of the key findings is that poverty for very young children can have lasting consequences.  Rhode Island College Graduate Tina Ristikari is one of the researchers who have been studying this data. She told Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison what the Ocean State can learn from it.

PASA

Representatives from 10 different cities head to Rhode Island this week to find out how Providence provides afterschool programs. They're interested in the Providence Afterschool Alliance, which coordinates bussing and activities for roughly 2,000 Providence students.

PASA works with nonprofits that provide a range of programs from art and music to science, math and sports. The group also works with city and school officials to serve roughly one-third of all Providence middle school students. In recent years, PASA has been expanding into high schools. 

Elisabeth Harrison

School resource officers, police officers who are embedded in public schools, have become commonplace in Rhode Island. But the practice is under new scrutiny after a controversial incident in South Carolina, where an officer dragged a high school student from her chair, flipping the student and her desk onto the floor in the process.

In Burrillville, Officer David Beauchemin takes what I would describe as a community policing approach to the district's five public schools.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

There’s an epidemic of opioid addiction and overdose unfolding across Rhode Island right now, and Burrillville, a small town in the northwestern corner of the state has been particularly hard hit.

Jesse M. Smith Library in Harrisville
RIPR

Join Rhode Island Public Radio for a listening party for our series One Square Mile: Burrillville at the Jesse M. Smith Memorial Library in Harrisville!  Hear highlights from the series, meet the local reporters who produced the stories, and share your stories with us!

RIPR FILE

Two survivors of sexual assault will testify Monday before a statehouse commission aimed at curbing sexual violence on college campuses.

Commission member Peg Langhammer directs the nonprofit Day One, which helped to arrange the victims’ testimony. Langhammer said they will share details from their personal experiences and discuss what happened after the sexual assault.

One day after learning his non-Hodgkins lymphoma is in remission, Red Sox Manager John Farrell says he is feeling grateful.

During a Friday afternoon conference call with reporters, Farrell said he's recovering after treatment.

"Basically there was six months of chemo given in an eight week period," Farrell said. "That was to combat the aggressive nature of the cancer."

Farrell described the treatment regimen as "pretty intense."

"It beat me up physically, but honestly right now, feeling pretty darn good."

Elisabeth Harrison

Five years after lawmakers approved a formula to determine state aid to school districts, Governor Gina Raimondo is calling for a review  of the system. 

Raimondo has convened a panel of more than two dozen lawmakers, businesspeople, school leaders and others to study the way the state distributes money to elementary and secondary schools.

Questions for the panel include funding for charter schools, special education services and the overall effectiveness of K-12 spending, which is the second largest piece of the state budget.

Elisabeth Harrison

Governor Gina Raimondo is defending her administration from criticism that information has become harder to obtain.

Some reporters, editors and good government groups have complained about less-than-forthcoming responses to requests for public documents and a lack of access to public officials under Raimondo's leadership.  

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Rhode Island’s Council for Elementary and Secondary Education approved funding for school building projects in more than a dozen school districts. Most of the money comes from a multi-million school building authority proposed by Governor Gina Raimondo and passed by state lawmakers.

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