Eric Deggans

Eric Deggans is NPR's first full-time TV critic.

Deggans came to NPR in 2013 from the Tampa Bay Times, where he served a TV/Media Critic and in other roles for nearly 20 years. A journalist for more than 20 years, he is also the author of Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation, a look at how prejudice, racism and sexism fuels some elements of modern media, published in October 2012, by Palgrave Macmillan.

In August 2013, Deggans guest hosted CNN's media analysis show Reliable Sources, joining a select group of journalists and media critics filling in for departed host Howard Kurtz. Earlier in the same month, he was awarded the Florida Press Club's first-ever Diversity award, honoring his coverage of issues involving race and media. He received the Legacy award from the National Association of Black Journalists' A&E Task Force, an honor bestowed to "seasoned A&E journalists who are at the top of their careers." Deggans serves on the board of educators, journalists and media experts who select the George Foster Peabody Awards for excellence in electronic media.

He also has joined a prestigious group of contributors to the first ethics book created in conjunction with the Poynter Institute for Media Studies for journalism's digital age: The New Ethics of Journalism, published in August 2013, by Sage/CQ Press.

Deggans has won reporting and writing awards from the Society for Features Journalism, American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors, the Society of Professional Journalists, the National Association of Black Journalists, The Florida Press Club and the Florida Society of News Editors. In 2010, he made national headlines interviewing former USDA official Shirley Sherrod at the NABJ's summer convention in San Diego, leading a panel discussion that was covered by all the major cable news and network TV morning shows.

Named in 2009, as one of Ebony magazine's "Power 150" – a list of influential black Americans which also included Oprah Winfrey and PBS host Gwen Ifill – Deggans was selected to lecture at Columbia University's prestigious Graduate School of Journalism in 2008 and 2005. He has lectured or taught as an adjunct professor at Loyola University, California State University, Indiana University, University of Tampa, Eckerd College and many other colleges.

His writing has also appeared in the New York Times online, Salon magazine, CNN.com, the Washington Post, Village Voice, VIBE magazine, Chicago Tribune, Detroit Free Press, Chicago Sun-Times, Seattle Times, Emmy magazine, Newsmax magazine, Rolling Stone Online and a host of other newspapers across the country.

From 2004 to 2005, Deggans sat on the then-St. Petersburg Times editorial board and wrote bylined opinion columns. From 1997 to 2004, he worked as TV critic for the Times, crafting reviews, news stories and long-range trend pieces on the state of the media industry both locally and nationally. He originally joined the paper as its pop music critic in November 1995. He has worked at the Asbury Park Press in New Jersey and both the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Pittsburgh Press newspapers in Pennsylvania.

Now serving as chair of the Media Monitoring Committee for the National Association of Black Journalists, he has also served on the board of directors for the national Television Critics Association and on the board of the Mid-Florida Society of Professional Journalists.

Additionally, he worked as a professional drummer in the 1980s, touring and performing with Motown recording artists The Voyage Band throughout the Midwest and in Osaka, Japan. He continues to perform with area bands and recording artists as a drummer, bassist and vocalist.

Deggans earned a Bachelor of Arts in political science and journalism from Indiana University.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: When this year's Oscar nominations were announced and all the acting nominees went to white performers, there were calls for a boycott of the Academy Awards. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans has been looking at a new study from the University of Southern California. It suggests that this goes beyond the Oscars and beyond race. ERIC DEGGANS, BYLINE: According to a new study from USC's Annenberg School for...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: All right, the streaming service Hulu is premiering a miniseries tonight that's adapted from Stephen King's time travel novel "11.22.63." NPR TV critic Eric Deggans has this review. ERIC DEGGANS, BYLINE: At first, Jake Epping doesn't look much like a crusading hero. Played by James Franco, he's a divorced, mediocre high school teacher with a goatee that makes him come off like a failed hipster. He likes...

HBO's music industry drama Vinyl comes at you like a classic rock song you can't get out of your head. Powerful. Emotional. But also kind of predictable. It's obvious from one of the earliest moments in the first episode, when Bobby Cannavale 's out-of-control record company owner Richie Finestra stumbles into a smoky club circa 1971 and finds the New York Dolls. Director-producer Martin Scorsese does an amazing job re-creating the anarchic spirit of the time, with drugged-out fans and...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: Samantha Bee is currently the only woman hosting a late-night news comedy show. The former "Daily Show" correspondent debuted her new satire show called "Full Frontal" on TBS last night. NPR's TV critic Eric Deggans says Samantha Bee has barely missed a beat from her previous job. ERIC DEGGANS, BYLINE: All those fans who worried that "The Daily Show's" go-for-the-jugular political satire left when...

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: And the cable channel FX has found new drama in one of the most publicized trials in recent memory. Its series "The People V. O.J. Simpson" - "American Crime Story" debuts Tuesday. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans said the show about a 20-year-old trial brings a potent message about today's criminal justice system. ERIC DEGGANS, BYLINE: FX's ambitious series doesn't even start with the 1994 murders of...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: You know about the personalized ads that follow you on Facebook and show up in your Twitter feed. They're based on the data you generate online. Well, now there's one more way that data will be sliced and diced. Nielsen calls itself the company that counts what people watch, listen to and buy, and now it will be doing that by tracking your online conversations about TV shows. It's already looking at...

As the pilot episode for ABC's counter terrorism drama Quantico begins, one of the biggest stars in Bollywood is lying in the ruins of a bomb blast. It's Priyanka Chopra, and she's playing Alex Parrish, an FBI trainee falsely accused of setting off the explosion. She's also making history as the first South Asian woman to play the lead in a network TV drama. "The bomber knew exactly what they were doing," Chopra says as Parrish in a later episode. "They framed the brown girl." But the story...

As I watched each episode of the second season of Amazon's Transparent , the same question kept popping into my mind: Are the Pfeffermans the most dysfunctional family now on television? The first episode of the new season begins with an awkward wedding photo. The family has gathered for eldest daughter Sarah's marriage to her lesbian partner. But the show's lead character, Jeffrey Tambor's transgender academic Maura Pfefferman, has a problem: Her homophobic sister is in the audience. "She's...

They won't actually get to host Saturday Night Live , but four GOP candidates have completed agreements with NBC allowing them to broadcast campaign messages on affiliate stations in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina over Thanksgiving weekend. These deals resulted from "equal time" requests made after leading GOP candidate Donald Trump guest-hosted Saturday Night Live on Nov. 7. The campaigns of John Kasich, Mike Huckabee, Jim Gilmore and Lindsey Graham will have access to network...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: This next story comes with a huge spoiler alert for fans of "Scandal." I repeat - spoiler alert. Got it, "Scandal" watchers? You've been warned. Last night's episode of the ABC drama was a bold challenge to the way network TV normally depicts a sensitive issue, the decision to end a pregnancy. Here's NPR TV critic Eric Deggans. ERIC DEGGANS, BYLINE: When lead character Olivia Pope was shown having an...

SPOILER ALERT: Be warned that this post discusses details from Thursday's winter finale of ABC's drama Scandal. ABC's buzzed-about drama Scandal dropped a bombshell episode Thursday, seeming to show lead character Olivia Pope secretly ending a pregnancy she may have had with her lover, President Fitzgerald Grant. Earlier in the episode another character, former First Lady Mellie Grant – now divorced and the junior Senator from Virginia – filibustered a spending bill which might have helped...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In a year when more than 400 series will air on various television-like platforms, why should anyone still care about Sunday night's Emmy Awards? The short answer: It's still the biggest honor in TV, handed out by the very people who make all the stuff we're watching on our smartphones, tablets, laptops and big-screen monitors. And it can be a pretty interesting barometer of what's hot and what's coming next in the TV industry — if you know what to watch for. (We'll also be live-tweeting...

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