Ian Donnis

Political Reporter

Ian Donnis has been the political reporter for Rhode Island Public Radio since 2009. The Washington Post has called him one of Rhode Island’s best political reporters. Besides reporting, Ian tweets at @IanDon, hosts RIPR’s weekly Political Roundtable, and contributes to the station’s On Politics blog.

He was for many years a regular panelist on WPRI/WNAC-TV’s Newsmakers, is an occasional guest on RI-PBS' A Lively Experiment, and has been a political debate panelist for each of Rhode Island's three commercial television stations.

Ian previously worked for the Providence Phoenix, the Worcester Telegram & Gazette, and The Associated Press. His reporting has been recognized by the AP, the New England Press Association, the Rhode Island Press Association, and Rhode Island for Community & Justice.

Ways To Connect

Thanks for stopping by. The legislative year is almost over -- the traditional part, anyway -- but the political world always keeps spinning. I welcome your tips and thoughts at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

House Majority Whip Jay Edwards (D-Tiverton) joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss the budget passed Tuesday by the House of Representatives; the way forward on curbing fire service costs; and the outlook for Governor Raimondo's truck-toll proposal.

House Majority Whip Jay Edwards (D-Tiverton) joins Bonus Q+A this week to discuss the House budget; whether lawmakers should investigate 38 Studios; the criteria for considering a Providence ballpark; and much more.

On a 6 to 3 vote, the Senate Education Committee passed a bill Wednesday restricting the growth of charter schools.

The legislation sponsored by Senator Adam Satchell (D-West Warwick) requires city or town councils in a host community to approve new charter schools. The bill would also keep charter school funding at the current level until the state adopts a new formula for funding charter and traditional public schools.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The Rhode Island House broke from tradition Tuesday night by unanimously passing a budget for the next fiscal year during a speedy three-hour session. The spending plan cuts some business taxes while giving Governor Gina Raimondo much of what she wanted.

Budget debates in the House of Representatives traditionally go until the wee hours of the next day. So even veteran lawmakers were surprised when the chamber approved an $8.7 billion budget for the fiscal year starting July first faster than at any time in at least 30 years.

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