Ian Donnis

Political Reporter

Ian Donnis has been the political reporter for Rhode Island Public Radio since 2009. The Washington Post has called him one of Rhode Island’s best political reporters. Besides reporting, Ian tweets at @IanDon, hosts RIPR’s weekly Political Roundtable, and contributes to the station’s On Politics blog.

He was for many years a regular panelist on WPRI/WNAC-TV’s Newsmakers, is an occasional guest on RI-PBS' A Lively Experiment, and has been a political debate panelist for each of Rhode Island's three commercial television stations.

Ian previously worked for the Providence Phoenix, the Worcester Telegram & Gazette, and The Associated Press. His reporting has been recognized by the AP, the New England Press Association, the Rhode Island Press Association, and Rhode Island for Community & Justice.

Ways to Connect

Ian Donnis / RIPR

With just five days until Rhode Island’s presidential primary, the campaigns are pushing hard for votes. A close race is expected between Democrats Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, and Latino voters could play an important role in the outcome.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Former gubernatorial candidate Ken Block is calling on Governor Gina Raimondo to ask the state Supreme Court for an opinion on the constitutionality of legislative grants.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse stopped by our studio Friday to discuss a wide range of issues, including the 6/10 Connector, the free speech debate on climate change, the outlook for Hillary Clinton, the plight of the middle class, the threat posed by ISIS, and more.

Happy mid-April, and thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

State Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss changes in Rhode Island's healthcare landscape, how lawmakers will address the proposed legalization of marijuana, and the outlook on improving public education.

State Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed joins Bonus Q&A this week to discuss charter schools, the outlook on ethics reform, her future plans, promoting green jobs, leadership at the state Board of Elections, and other issues.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The state Department of Transportation held the last in a series of workshops Wednesday on the future of the 6/10 Connector. State DOT director Peter Alviti recently stopped by our studio to talk about the future of the Connector and related issues. Alviti spoke with Rhode Island Public Radio political reporter Ian Donnis and political analyst Scott MacKay.

(We should note that this conversation took place before a sometimes terse meeting on the 6/10 Connector earlier this week.)

Ian Donnis / RIPR

House Finance Committee members expressed backing Wednesday for the intention of the state’s new effort to boost tourism, despite the much-publicized mistakes in the initial rollout

John Bender / RIPR

The Democratic presidential campaigns opened new offices in the state Wednesday. The Bernie Sanders Campaign opened a field office in Wakefield. Hillary Clinton's campaign opened an office in Central Falls.

Both Democrats opened campaign offices in Providence last week, as Rhode Island's April 26 primary drew closer.

Meanwhile, a campaign office for Republican candidate, John Kasich held a grand opening in Warwick on Tuesday.

Baseball is back, and the contact sport of politics continues unabated. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

John Marion, executive director of the good government group Common Cause of Rhode Island, joins Political Roundtable this week 

John Marion, executive director of Common Cause of Rhode Island, joins Bonus Q+A this week to discuss a range of political and good government issues.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

State Rep. Karen MacBeth (R-Cumberland) said Tuesday that she believes a rising tide of discontent among Rhode Island voters will boost her campaign against First District Congressman David Cicilline.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Local voters will go to the polls in a little more than three weeks, on April 26. As part of our RhodyVotes ’16 coverage, Rhode Island Public Radio political reporter Ian Donnis went looking for answers about how and why Trump zipped to the front of the local Republican presidential field.

It was quite the week in Rhode Island politics, and the fallout led to tardy publication of this week's column. So thanks for stopping by. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

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