Kristin Gourlay

Health Care Reporter

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for WFPL Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio.

Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

She’s won multiple national, regional, and local awards for her reporting, and her work has aired on NPR and stations throughout the country. She’s particularly proud of the variety of protective clothing she’s had to wear on assignment, including helmets, waders, safety goggles, and snowshoes.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Gourlay loves music, cooking, and spending time with her family.

Ways to Connect

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here’s what’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Dec. 6:

THUNDERMIST CEO: Thundermist Health Center President and CEO Chuck Jones is stepping down in February. Jones joined Thundermist in 2008. He moves on to be CEO of Harbor Health Services in Dorchester, MA. Thundermist will conduct a nationwide search for his replacement.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

State lawmakers continue their oversight of the state's child welfare agency.  At a hearing Tuesday night, Department of Children, Youth, and Families director Jamia McDonald said her organization has made progress. 

Memorial Hospital

Here’s what’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Nov. 29:

MEDICAID: Rhode Island has been awarded about $130 million dollars from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid to continue overhauling its Medicaid program. 

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Story Synopsis

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island has been awarded $130 million dollars over the next five years from the federal government to continue its work overhauling Medicaid. The health insurance program for the poor serves nearly one in three Rhode Islanders. The money is earmarked for efforts that pay for better quality care instead of the quantity of care.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line. 

This week, Dave speaks with Paul DeRoche, senior vice president for government relations at the Greater Providence Chamber of Commerce.

The discussion centers on what's hot for seasonal retail activity this year in downtown Providence and beyond.

When to listen:

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50 pm on Rhode Island Public Radio, 88.1 FM, 91.5 FM and 102.7 FM.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

This Thanksgiving many of us are gathering with family – some of whom we haven’t seen for a while. If that includes older relatives and friends, you might notice some changes. But which changes are part of the normal aging process, and which might indicate there’s a problem? 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island’s Department of Human Services has submitted its corrective action plan to the U.S. Food and Nutrition Service. That’s what the federal agency required when it discovered a number of problems with Rhode Island’s new online benefits system, UHIP.

Excessive wait times and overcrowding in DHS field offices. Computer glitches. A lack of staff training on the new system. The problems got so bad with the state’s new system for food stamps and other benefits that the federal agency asked them to draw up an emergency plan to fix the problems.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The City of Providence is recruiting members for a new Muslim-American advisory board.  The mayor’s office says the initiative is aimed at protecting and serving every resident of the city regardless of race, religion, or other identifiers. 

Festival Ballet Providence

A storage facility full of costumes for Festival Ballet’s annual production of the Nutcracker has apparently been robbed. The Providence ballet company is scrambling to find replacements in time for opening night.

Megan Hall / RIPR

Here’s what’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Nov. 21:

screen-grab

Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and family were spotted in Rhode Island this weekend. The Clintons visited Westerly where they stopped into a local bookstore.

The cashier on duty wasn’t expecting a visit from one of the world’s most famous families. But the Clintons walked into the Savoy Bookshop and Café on Sunday. Savoy’s Annie Philbrick says they did some shopping.

“The whole family came in, Hillary and Bill, and Chelsea and her husband and their daughter, and bought a wide selection of adults’ books and kids’ books.”

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin will once again try to make drunk driving penalties more stringent in the Ocean State. 

Kilmartin’s office says he has filed legislation for the past five years to try to stiffen sentencing and intends to do so again this legislative session. He wants drivers who kill someone while under the influence to face a maximum of 30, up from 15, years in prison. And drivers who injure someone while intoxicated would face increased penalties as well. That’s a provision the American Civil Liberties Union of Rhode Island has opposed in the past.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Low income Rhode Islanders who seek help from emergency food banks are still going hungry. That’s according to a new report from the Rhode Island Community Food Bank. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Sen. Josh Miller (D-Cranston) has had a front row seat during the implementation of Obamacare in Rhode Island. Now, the prospect of a Trump presidency is creating uncertainty among proponents of the law. 

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