Kristin Gourlay

Health Care Reporter

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for WFPL Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio.

Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

She’s won multiple national, regional, and local awards for her reporting, and her work has aired on NPR and stations throughout the country. She’s particularly proud of the variety of protective clothing she’s had to wear on assignment, including helmets, waders, safety goggles, and snowshoes.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Gourlay loves music, cooking, and spending time with her family.

Ways to Connect

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI) convenes federal and state public health experts today to talk about Rhode Island’s Zika prevention plan. One of the goals is to prepare as mosquito season approaches.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A nonprofit that makes nutritional supplements for malnourished children is expanding operations in Rhode Island. Edesia has cut the ribbon on a new 83,000 square-foot manufacturing facility in Quonset Business Park.

Edesia makes packets of what’s called ready-to-use food - essentially a heavily fortified peanut butter meant to treat severe malnutrition in children.

The company says packets were distributed to nearly a million children in 2015, most recently to Syrian refugees and victims of the Ethiopian drought.

photo by Megan Hall

Consolidation is the name of the health care game right now – but is it good for patients?

Let's review what's in the works in our state right now:

Memorial Hospital

A nurses’ union has sued Memorial Hospital’s parent company, Care New England, to try to maintain obstetrics and other services at the Pawtucket-based community hospital. They're asking regulators to look for more alternatives to maintaining the hospital as it is.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Hillary Clinton claimed primary victories in Connecticut, Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania, but on the Democratic side at least, Rhode Island went its own way. Nearly 55 percent of voters in the Democratic primary chose Sanders, compared with 43 percent for Clinton. Sanders' margin of victory was larger than expected.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Hillary Clinton was in Central Falls Saturday to campaign in advance of Tuesday’s primary election. 

Rhode Island’s Democractic leadership turned out in force to welcome Clinton, including the state’s congressional delegation and Gov. Gina Raimondo.

Welcome to Central Falls sign
RIPR file

A new healthcare effort in Central Falls is getting a boost. A program called the Neighborhood Health Station has won a grant to pay for outreach workers to prevent overdose deaths and reduce emergency room use.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Veterans seeking care at the Providence VA can now sign up for acupuncture treatments. It’s just one of several new alternative medical therapies offered at the VA to try to address pain and mental health. 

RIPR file photo

Rhode Island’s health insurance exchange says UnitedHealthcare will stop offering plans in 2017. That means health insurance consumers will have fewer options in the coming open enrollment period.

Cynthia Goldsmith / CDC

The Rhode Island Department of Health says the first case of Zika virus has been confirmed in the state. The state health agency says the man is in his 60s and recently traveled to Haiti. That’s one of the countries where Zika transmission is active.

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid

New data from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid brings greater insight into health disparities at the local level.

John Bender / RIPR

Rhode Islanders have long supported Democrat Hillary Clinton. She won the 2008 primary against future President Barack Obama, but are residents ready to vote for her again?

Cynthia Goldsmith / CDC

The spread of Zika virus may have come as a surprise to some. But not to Julia Gold. The Rhode Island Department of Health’s climate change expert speaks with Rhode Island Public Radio’s Kristin Gourlay for this week’s The Pulse about the future of mosquito and other vector-borne diseases and how the state can prepare and respond. 

 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

An increasing number of pregnant women are in treatment for opioid addiction. They face a heart-wrenching dilemma: stop taking the medication that’s helped them stay sober, or risk a baby born in withdrawal.

Now, researchers want to know if they can predict how severe that withdrawal will be, and whether they can head symptoms off before they get worse. And they're recruiting mothers like Ashley to help them answer those questions.

Kristin Gourlay / ripr

  Hospitals could face another rate cut under the Medicaid budget proposed for this fiscal year. Tension over the cuts came up during a budget hearing this week.

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