Kristin Gourlay

Health Care Reporter

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for WFPL Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio.

Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

She’s won multiple national, regional, and local awards for her reporting, and her work has aired on NPR and stations throughout the country. She’s particularly proud of the variety of protective clothing she’s had to wear on assignment, including helmets, waders, safety goggles, and snowshoes.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Gourlay loves music, cooking, and spending time with her family.

Ways to Connect

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Low income Rhode Islanders who seek help from emergency food banks are still going hungry. That’s according to a new report from the Rhode Island Community Food Bank. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Sen. Josh Miller (D-Cranston) has had a front row seat during the implementation of Obamacare in Rhode Island. Now, the prospect of a Trump presidency is creating uncertainty among proponents of the law. 

Courtesy Sheldon Whitehouse office

U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse, a Democrat, is one of several federal lawmakers voicing concerns over Republican Donald Trump’s early preparations for the White House.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

State Medicaid programs – including Rhode Island – fail to provide enough access to cures for hepatitis C. That’s the conclusion of a new report from Harvard Law School’s Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation and the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable. The authors say restricting treatment is illegal.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here’s what’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Nov. 15:

OPIOID ADDICTION TREATMENT FOR INMATES: -The medical director for state correctional system, Dr. Jennifer Clark, told members of the governor’s opioid overdose task force that more inmates will be getting medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A new community health clinic has opened in Scituate. Organizers hope it will pave the way for greater access to health care in the area. The new Scituate Neighborhood Health Station models itself on a similar clinic in Central Falls.

The Health Station is the brainchild of former state Health Department Director Doctor Michael Fine, who recently cut the ribbon on a Neighborhood Health Station in Central Falls. The clinics provide sliding-scale fees for health care and reach out to residents in the community.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A state of uncertainty lingers for Rhode Island’s online health insurance marketplace, HealthSource RI, now that Donald Trump has been elected president. Trump has promised to repeal Obamacare, which made the exchanges possible. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

State Health and human services officials say they’re preparing a response to the warning they’ve received from the federal government. Aa federal agency has threatened to decrease administrative funding for food stamps.

The U.S. Food and Nutrition Service sent a letter asking the state for a corrective action plan to fix its glitch new benefits system, UHIP . Health and human services director Melba Depena Affigne says one of the biggest problems they have to address is the number of people who are waiting too long for benefits.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Police departments in our region and around the country are scrambling to respond to the opioid addiction crisis. 

A spate of high profile police shootings have drawn attention to the way police respond to people dealing with mental illness. 

Progreso Latino

Immigrants across the nation are reacting to Donald Trump’s election victory. Rhode Island-based social service agency Progreso Latino serves immigrants around Providence and Pawtucket. Director Mario Bueno says many of his clients are still trying to digest the news of Trump’s win. But he says there’s already fear about Trump's plans to end some immigration amnesty programs.

The U.S. Food and Nutrition service sent a letter to Rhode Island’s Department of Human Services citing serious concerns about the system. The federal agency says it will suspend administrative funds for food stamps in Rhode Island unless the state comes up with a plan to fix problems with a new benefits system.

John Bender / RIPR

Preliminary results for Rhode Island's General Election show Democrat Hillary Clinton leading Republican Donald Trump. A ballot measure for a casino in Tiverton appears headed for passage. And voters have approved bond issues for port upgrades, green space, the state Veteran's home and construction at the University of Rhode Island. 

What’s happening in your health in Rhode Island, Nov. 8

Rhode Island-based CVSHealth says it will be laying off hundreds of employees across the country. That includes about 250 positions in Rhode Island.

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