Kristin Gourlay

Health Care Reporter

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for WFPL Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio.

Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

She’s won multiple national, regional, and local awards for her reporting, and her work has aired on NPR and stations throughout the country. She’s particularly proud of the variety of protective clothing she’s had to wear on assignment, including helmets, waders, safety goggles, and snowshoes.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Gourlay loves music, cooking, and spending time with her family.

Ways To Connect

It’s been a little more than a year since Rhode Island signed an agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice to stop segregating and underpaying developmentally disabled workers. Fulfilling the terms of that agreement remain a work in progress.

HealthSourceRI

Months into her tenure as head of HealthSource RI, Anya Rader Wallack is still trying to undo a tangle of customer service problems.

Public domain image

Governor Gina Raimondo signs a new law today giving disabled adults the opportunity to save money in a tax-free account.

The law recognizes that financial assistance is available for disabled, school-age Rhode Islanders. But disabled adults must sometimes rely on private funds to pay for expenses.

World Hepatitis Alliance

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015 marks the 5th annual World Hepatitis Day, a global awareness-raising event launched by the World Hepatitis Alliance, in concert with the World Health Organization.

On Saturday, August 1st, Providence marks the occasion with "C is for Cure: A WaterFire Lighting for RI Defeats Hep C."

Steven Depolo / Creative Commons license

Exposure to a trio of common chemicals can affect developing babies’ brains. But it’s unclear what role those chemicals play as kids get older. One Brown University researcher aims to find out.

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