Kristin Gourlay

Health Care Reporter

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for WFPL Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio.

Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

She’s won multiple national, regional, and local awards for her reporting, and her work has aired on NPR and stations throughout the country. She’s particularly proud of the variety of protective clothing she’s had to wear on assignment, including helmets, waders, safety goggles, and snowshoes.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Gourlay loves music, cooking, and spending time with her family.

Ways To Connect

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The Department of Children, Youth, and Families is struggling with an influx of children who have been abused and neglected. Many of their cases go before Rhode Island’s Family Court, where judges play a key role in deciding when children can return to their homes. The drama of lives in upheaval unfolds every day of the week in the Garrahy Judicial complex, downtown Providence.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Lisa (we've changed her name to protect her privacy)  spent years trying to get her daughter back, after the Dept. of Children, Youth, and Families removed her. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island doesn’t have enough foster families to meet a growing need. That’s one reason the Department of Children, Youth, and Families places a higher percentage of kids in group homes than almost any other state. DCYF officials acknowledge the problem. But recruiting new foster families has been tough.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Children who experience abuse or neglect–or even the stress of poverty—can have serious health problems later in life. That’s one of many challenges for children in Rhode Island’s child welfare system. We continue our series “Children in Crisis” with this look at how some health care professionals hope to address those challenges. 

Rhode Island Department of Health

The state Medical Examiner’s Office reports fewer cases in the backlog since the departure of the chief medical examiner. She was placed on administrative leave, and has now resigned.

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