Kristin Gourlay

Health Care Reporter

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for WFPL Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio.

Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

She’s won multiple national, regional, and local awards for her reporting, and her work has aired on NPR and stations throughout the country. She’s particularly proud of the variety of protective clothing she’s had to wear on assignment, including helmets, waders, safety goggles, and snowshoes.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Gourlay loves music, cooking, and spending time with her family.

Ways to Connect

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

In the wake of recent mass and police shootings, Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse says Congress may be gearing up to consider more gun legislation. But, Whitehouse cautions that he has seen similar efforts fail before.

Whitehouse says he’s hopeful about legislation that would restrict people who are on anti-terrorism no-fly lists from buying guns. It's currently in limbo. Still, Whitehouse says the outlook is promising for gun control advocates.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Here's what's happening in health care in Rhode Island, including stories about addiction treatment, intellectual disabilities, medical marijuana, outdoor recreation, antibiotic resistance, and more:

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Nutrition advice seems to change from one moment to the next – don’t eat fat, eat fat, don’t eat carbs, eat carbs. A new exhibit at Johnson and Wales University’s Culinary Museum takes us back to a time when those messages were just beginning to enter the modern world.

RIPR

Rhode Island College will offer the state’s first undergraduate certificate for students with intellectual disabilities. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

State health officials say we’re spending too much on nursing homes. Instead, they say, we could be caring for people, for less money, at home.

Aaron Read / RIPR

Your weekly briefing about what's happening in health care: opioid legislation, depression treatment, special needs, and child welfare.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week, Mark and Dave speak with Warwick mayor Scott Avedisian. He's got an update on the development of Warwick’s new ‘City Centre,' details about a new hotel and the plan to use T.F. Green Airport as an engine to drive economic growth in the region.

Elisabeth Harrison

Rhode Island officials, citizens, faith groups and more have been reacting today to the violence in Dallas. 

Many Tweeted their reactions, posted on Facebook, or sent statements to our newsroom. We've collected many of them in this Storify below (scroll down).

Courtesy RI Department of Human Services

  Rhode Island’s new online portal for programs like Medicaid and food stamps is set to go live mid-September. The new system will streamline the process for people seeking services. It could also impact some DHS employees.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A Brown University medical student wants to register every med student in the country to vote. And the group he founded is gaining momentum.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

This September, Rhode Island’s Department of Human Services launches a new online portal for health and social service benefits. It’s the state’s biggest IT project ever. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The Obama administration has announced new rules that would let doctors treat more patients addicted to opioids. That could help Rhode Island, where access to treatment is limited.

Rhode Island State Archives

Independence Day is over, but there’s much more to learn about Rhode Island’s role in the American Revolution. The State Archives has new exhibit opening this week about Rhode Island in the year 1776.

Greg Pare / Rhode Island General Assembly

Imagine having a life-threatening disease that isn’t responding to the typical drugs. But there’s a drug out there – FDA-approved for other conditions – that might work for you. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

New research from the Pew Charitable Trusts shows Rhode Island is leading the nation when it comes to reducing painkiller prescriptions. State officials attribute the drop to education for doctors and patients about the risk of opioid overdose.

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