Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is an NPR international correspondent covering South America for NPR. She is based in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Previously, she served a NPR's correspondent based in Israel, reporting on stories happening throughout the Middle East. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011 George Foster Peabody Award, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club, and an Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Alliance for Women and the Media's Gracie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement.

Before her assignment to Jerusalem began in 2009, Garcia-Navarro served for more than a year as NPR News' Baghdad Bureau Chief and before that three years as NPR's foreign correspondent in Mexico City, reporting from that region as well as on special assignments abroad.

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America, reporting from Cuba, Syria, Panama and Europe. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. In 2002, she began a two-year reporting stint based in Iraq.

In addition to the Murrow award, Garcia-Navarro was honored with the 2006 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for a two-part series "Migrants' Job Search Empties Mexican Community." She contributed to NPR News reporting on Iraq, which was recognized with a 2005 Peabody Award and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton.

Garcia-Navarro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in International Relations from Georgetown University and an Master of Arts degree in journalism from City University in London. Lourdes is married to Times of London journalist James Hider. They have a daughter and they sometimes travel together for work and always for play.

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Parallels
8:32 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

Expats Find Brazil's Reputation For Race-Blindness Is Undone By Reality

American Ky Adderley (center) with his wife, Shanna Farrar Adderley, and their daughter, Gisela Sky, live in Brazil. He says being an educated black man feels like a subversive act in Brazil. "All the blacks that I see are in service jobs, and the darker you are, the less you are seen," he says. "Your job is maybe back in the kitchen and not out waiting a table."
Courtesy of Ky Adderly

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 11:35 pm

There is a joke among Brazilians that a Brazilian passport is the most coveted on the black market because no matter what your background — Asian, African or European — you can fit in here. But the reality is very different.

I'm sitting in café with two women who don't want their names used because of the sensitivity of the topic. One is from the Caribbean; her husband is an expat executive.

"I was expecting to be the average-looking Brazilian; Brazil as you see on the media is not what I experienced when I arrived," she tells me.

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The Salt
8:19 am
Sun May 17, 2015

Assault On Salt: Uruguay Bans Shakers In Restaurants And Schools

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 2:51 pm

A typical Uruguayan asado, or barbecue, is made up of vast racks of prime cuts of beef, pork or chicken roasted on a grill next to — not on top of — a wood burning fire.

At parilla restaurants across the capitol Montevideo, the asados are pretty epic; the fatty cuts sizzle and then get slapped onto your plate, oozing with juice.

But if you want to grab a salt shaker and add a bit of extra salt to your meal these days in the Uruguayan capital, you can't.

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Parallels
9:00 pm
Mon May 11, 2015

Brazil's World Cup Legacy Includes $550M Stadium-Turned-Parking Lot

Brazil spent billions renovating and building World Cup stadiums. Almost a year after the tournament ended, the nation is still trying to figure out what to do with them. The Mane Garrincha Stadium in Brasilia, Brazil (shown here in April 2014), was the most expensive of the stadiums — at a cost of $550 million — and is now being used as a bus parking lot.
Eraldo Peres AP

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 10:20 am

It has been almost a year since the World Cup in Brazil. The party is long over, but the country is still dealing with the hangover — in the form of "white elephant" stadiums and unfinished infrastructure projects. They come at a time when the country faces economic woes and the prospect of another expensive mega event: next year's summer Olympics.

The most expensive World Cup stadium — located in the capital, Brasilia, and with a price tag of $550 million — is being used as a parking lot for buses.

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Parallels
5:04 am
Fri May 8, 2015

Once Philip Morris Workers, Now They Clamp Down On Uruguay's Smokers

Daniel Gomez (from left), Lister Sena and Ricardo Alvarez were laid off after working for years with Philip Morris in Uruguay. They are now inspectors enforcing the country's tough anti-smoking laws.
Lourdes Garcia-Navarro NPR

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 8:22 am

The tiny nation of Uruguay is fighting a big opponent – the tobacco giant Philip Morris. Their legal battle is over tough anti-smoking legislation enacted in Uruguay which Philip Morris is trying to overturn.

But Uruguay has found some unlikely allies – a group of former Philip Morris workers.

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Parallels
4:53 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Ex-Gitmo Detainees In Uruguay Protest At U.S. Embassy

Former Guantanamo prison inmates walk between their tents and the U.S. Embassy in Montevideo, Uruguay's capital, where four former prisoners are protesting what they say is an inadequate deal in exchange for permanent asylum.
Pablo Porciuncula AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 8:19 pm

When six Middle Eastern prisoners were freed from Guantanamo Bay prison and given refuge by the tiny South American country of Uruguay in December, they were grateful.

But four months later, four of them are camping outside the U.S. Embassy protesting as inadequate the deal they've been offered in exchange for permanent asylum.

Three small tents have been pitched on the smooth green lawn in front of the U.S. Embassy in Montevideo, Uruguay's capital.

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