This I Believe - Rhode Island

Wednesday at 6:45 AM, 8:45 AM and 5:45 PM

This I Believe RI with Frederic Reamer
Credit Scott Indermaur

Hosted by Frederic Reamer  |  Podcast Available HERE

Modeled on the popular 1950s radio series of the same name hosted by Edward R. Murrow, This I Believe - Rhode Island, hosted by Frederic Reamer, is an effort to share the many stories of people of Rhode Island... the personal experiences that have helped form the opinions of your neighbors. This I Believe - Rhode Island is also an opportunity for you to share your own beliefs and experiences.

If you are interested in submitting an essay, please see our guidelines here.

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Local Features
5:00 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

This I Believe Rhode Island: Utilitarianism

iPad. iPhone. Skype. Droid. Bluetooth. Many of us are old enough to remember that a text is something to read rather than do, tablets had 10 commandments on them rather than wi-fi connections, and a tweet is the sound made by a bird rather than a digital verb. Some of us yearn for simpler days when the word communication wasn't preceded by the letter "e," or perhaps we embrace with gusto today's electronic bells, whistles, and imperative. As we hear in this encore essay, for Caleb Woodhouse the relationship between yesteryear and yesterday is quite complex.

Caleb Woodhouse is a 1954 graduate of Brown University and a retired history teacher. He lives and rides his bicycle in Little Compton, Rhode Island with his wife Alessandra.

Local Features
5:18 am
Wed December 18, 2013

This I Believe Rhode Island: The Wild Place

The famed cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead once opined, "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."  Such sentiments often conjure up images of sweeping social change.  But as we hear from Diana Jackson, a small group of committed people can also have a profound impact on the quality of life in our own little corner of the world here in the Ocean State.

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Local Features
4:15 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

This I Believe Rhode Island: Keeping Safe

Isn’t it sad that the daily news seems filled with distressing stories about vicious assaults, cyber bullying, domestic violence, schoolyard brawls, and workplace conflict?  Whether there’s been an actual increase in such incidents is debatable, of course, especially given the speed with which modern news circulates.  But there’s no denying that personal safety is on our minds – a lot.   As the Roman philosopher Cicero wrote more than 2,000 years ago, “The safety of the people is the highest law.”  And we hear similar sentiments from Michael Obel-Omia.

Michael Obel-Omia is Interim Head of School at the Compass School in North Kingston and an adjunct faculty member in the University of Rhode Island School of Education.  He lives in Barrington, Rhode Island with his wife and three children.

Local Features
7:24 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

This I Believe Rhode Island: Getting Up Early

You know those middle-of-the-night or early-morning awakenings when your senses are unusually sharp? The slightest sounds take on new meaning, or perhaps otherwise fleeting thoughts become intrusive. Solitude and silence, although sometimes disquieting, seem to invite deep reflection and unusually intense awareness. As Henry David Thoreau says in Walden, “I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude.”  And we hear echoes of these sentiments from Erik Wilker.

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Local Features
5:00 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

This I Believe Rhode Island: A Good Scare

No one wants to be scared to death, at least not literally.  No one yearns for those dreaded moments when the telephone rings in the middle of the night with bad news, we barely escape a near-fatal car accident, or a loved one survives horrifyingly high-risk surgery.  Yet, for all sorts of mysterious reasons, some of us are drawn toward more benign forms of fright.  Some of us even seek opportunities to put a bit of scare in our lives.  And that’s just what we hear from Tracey Minkin.

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