This I Believe - Rhode Island

Wednesday at 6:45 AM, 8:45 AM and 5:45 PM

Credit Scott Indermaur

Hosted by Frederic Reamer

Modeled on the popular 1950s radio series of the same name hosted by Edward R. Murrow, This I Believe - Rhode Island, hosted by Frederic Reamer, is an effort to share the many stories of people of Rhode Island... the personal experiences that have helped form the opinions of your neighbors. This I Believe - Rhode Island is also an opportunity for you to share your own beliefs and experiences.

If you are interested in submitting an essay, please see our guidelines here.

  Some years ago, Sissela Bok, a moral philosopher, wrote a book entitled Lying in which she explores the ways in which people struggle to be truthful in their private and public lives, especially in circumstances that tempt us to lie or, at the very least, shade the truth -- sometimes for self-serving purposes and sometimes for what appear to be more magnanimous goals.  For many, truth telling is a lifelong challenge.  And as we hear from a very wise 13-year-old, Bea Hruska, our lifelong instincts are often sown in childhood.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Neighbors

Jun 9, 2015

Community.  It's such a simple word, and it's bandied about so casually that it seems almost trite.  Yet for many Rhode Islanders, a deep sense of community is what keeps us rooted in the Ocean State, not only in our connections to Westerly and Warren, Cumberland and Cranston, but in our own unique neighborhood, to our friends at church or synagogue, and to the people we expect to bump into at the diner down the street.  In this encore essay, theater director Curt Columbus tells us what community in his corner of Rhode Island means to him.

 

Curt Columbus takes walks near his home in Pawtucket and is artistic director of the Trinity Repertory Company.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Homesick

Jun 2, 2015

Maturation is a wonderful thing – if and when it happens, of course.  If we’re really fortunate, throughout our lives we have the wherewithal to learn from our mistaken assumptions and correct course. H. G. Wells once famously wrote, “There's truths you have to grow into.”  For some of us, it takes decades to grow into these truths.  But sometimes even an adolescent has the ability to face life’s hard truths, as with twelve-year-old Anika Istok.

Anika Istok is completing the seventh grade at the Gordon School in East Providence.  She lives with her family in Cranston.

It seems almost trite to say that nature is a remarkable teacher.  But that’s okay.  Indeed, nature is a remarkable teacher. All of us can point to lessons nature has taught us about appreciating life’s wonders, managing uncertainty and unpredictability, coping with adversity and accepting that we have so little control over some aspects of our lives. The English poet William Wordsworth wrote in his poem The Tables Turned, “Come forth into the light of things, let nature be your teacher.”  And we hear similar sentiments from Lisa Jacobson.

 

Lisa Jacobson is an artist, gardener, mother and teacher at Noble and Greenough School in Dedham, Massachusetts.  She lives with her family in Providence.

This I Believe Rhode Island: When It Falls Apart

May 19, 2015

Human foibles and failure.  We’ve all had our share during the course of our lives, to varying degrees.  Some disappointments and blunders are inevitable; what matters most is how we cope with and learn from them.  The Irish novelist James Joyce  famously wrote, “Mistakes are the portals of discovery.” Thirteen-year-old Sophie Grosswendt talks about how she’s learned to cope with failure.
 

   

Sophie Grosswendt is in the seventh grade at the Gordon School in East Providence.  She lives with her family in  Cranston.

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