AAA

As you’ve probably noticed, gas prices continue to drop at the pump. In Rhode Island, a gallon of regular unleaded is down 15 cents from last week. And AAA reports prices have dropped by a dime in Massachusetts with the average gallon in both states going for $2.15.

This is the sixth consecutive week for double digit drops.

In Connecticut gas prices are down by twelve cents to land at $2.35 a gallon.

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Gas prices have dropped by a penny in both Rhode Island and Massachusetts. The latest survey from AAA Southern New England puts the average gallon of regular unleaded at $3.59. That’s a tiny bit above the national average but lower than what drivers were paying at the pump a year ago. 

Bay State drivers are paying an average $3.51 a gallon. That’s also down a penny from last week.

AAA urges drivers in both Rhode Island and Massachusetts to shop around, since the range in gas prices spans from 21-cents in Rhode Island to 32-cents in Massachusetts.

    

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Gas prices are up a penny from last week in both Rhode Island and Massachusetts. Drivers have seen gas prices climb by 9 cents over the last month in both the Ocean State and the Bay State, that’s according to the latest survey from AAA Southern New England.

In Rhode Island, the average price for a gallon of regular unleaded is $3.52. It’s cheaper in Mass, at $3.44 a gallon. AAA urges drivers in both Rhode Island and Massachusetts to shop around, since the range in gas prices is about a quarter.

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Triple A is out with a study that should be a wake-up call for those who drive while drowsy.  The problem of sleepy driving is more prevalent than you might realize.

A study on sleepy driving commissioned by Triple ‘A’ finds that 28 percent of motorists reported being so tired in the past month they had a hard time keeping their eyes open.  Motorists between the ages of 19 and 24 were the most likely to report driving drowsy.  Elderly motorists and those between the ages of 16 and 18 were least likely to drive drowsy.

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