artscape

Chuck Hinman

The Jamestown Arts Center exhibit "Setting the Stage” presents a behind-the-scenes look at two celebrated designers: Set Designer Eugene Lee and Interior Designer Kyla Coburn.

Lee and Coburn were recently inducted into the RI Design Hall of Fame; Coburn was named Emerging Designer for her work at some of Rhode Island’s hippest restaurants and bars, and Lee received Lifetime Achievement recognition for his award-winning sets on Broadway, and his work for television and Trinity Rep.

Dead Animals: Taxidermy in Art

Mar 10, 2016
Chuck Hinman

Have you given any thought lately to your relationship with animals? Statistics reveal a contradictory interaction between humans and other species.

Here in the United States, the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals estimates that there could be as many as 176 million dogs and cats being kept as pets, many of them no doubt treated as beloved members of the family. On the other hand, figures from the Humane Society show billions of cattle, chickens and other livestock slaughtered every year for food.

Photo by Julieta Cervantes

For serious jazz fans, A Love Supreme, by saxophonist John Coltrane needs no introduction.  A Love Supreme was recorded in one day at the end of 1964, and released 51 years ago this month, in February of 1965. It’s since been recognized as one of the all-time great jazz masterworks.

On Saturday, Urban Bush Women, a group of African American dancers out of Brooklyn, bring their unique interpretation of Coltrane’s achievement to the Vets, in Providence. For this month’s Rhode Island Artscape, RIPR's Chuck Hinman reports on the psychology of Coltrane and jazz improvisation.

Chuck Hinman

At the Atrium Gallery at One Capitol Hill in Providence, there is a show called “Pawtucket: A Different Perspective.” It features 520 photos from Pawtucket’s 17th Annual Photo Contest. Contestants were told to hit the streets of the city in search of their particular vision of Pawtucket. 

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

This month we bring you a special, Thanksgiving Rhode Island  Artscape. We take look at the art and the history of the Thanksgiving menu, and how it’s changed

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Lupo's Heartbreak Hotel, the Providence rock club, turns 40 this year. First opened in 1975, the club started out in the Conrad Building on Westminster St. Two moves later, it's now on Washington St. in the Strand building. To celebrate 40 years of live music, Lupo's sister club, the Met in Pawtucket, hosted several nights of music featuring favorites from years past, including Roomful of Blues, The Schemers, Rizzz and The Young Adults. For this month's Artscape, RIPR's Chuck Hinman talked to founder Rich Lupo about how it all started and what's next.

Collection of John Benson

This Saturday, Sept. 26, the Newport Art Museum opens the exhibit "Reviving Durr Freedley: Newport's Forgotten Artist." Freedly painted the murals that cover the interior of the Seamen's Institute chapel, but the painter and his art has been all but forgotten, until now.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Art and medicine have long been intertwined - from the earliest depictions of human anatomy to modern art therapy. A new art exhibit (“Interstice: Memory, Mind, and Alzheimer's Disease," open through September 9 in the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts at Brown University) takes that relationship in a new direction. A neuroscientist and artist teamed up with fellow artists to explore what it’s like to have Alzheimer’s Disease. 

Matthew Clowney

A Providence-based photographer has been documenting a family with a transgender grandparent. The photos are part of an exhibit destined for the Boston Children’s Museum in the fall.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

For this month’s Rhode Island Artscape, we take a visit to the State Archives in downtown Providence. The agency has unveiled a new exhibit dedicated to odd and unexpected state artifacts. The historic objects range from counterfeit colonial money, to the death certificate of famed Providence author H.P. Lovecraft. Rhode Island Public Radio's morning host, Chuck Hinman went on a private tour of the exhibit with State Archivist Gwenn Stearn.

youtube

If you are a fan of live, acoustic music, at some point straining to hear over a loud bar crowd, you may have thought, wouldn’t it be great if my favorite performer could play at my house instead? It might surprise you to know the performer may be thinking the same thing. For this month’s Artscape, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Chuck Hinman examines the growing phenomenon of house concerts in the Ocean State.

John Bender / RIPR

It’s been a year since the death of local musician David Lamb, whose passing threw the future of the folk duo Brown Bird into question. This week saw the release of the band’s final album. Crafted during Lamb’s battle with leukemia, the album was finished by his wife MorganEve Swain, the other half of the band. Music journalists are calling it Brown Bird’s swan song.

Providence lawyer and mystery writer Jack Partridge is out with his third book.  His latest novel, Scratched, unravels the mystery of a dead university professor with ties to Providence’s Italian community.  

For this month’s Artscape, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Scott MacKay spoke with Partridge to talk about his novel and what makes Providence a great setting for a murder mystery.

Wikimedia Commons

One can usually hear the familiar strains of the Hallelujah Chorus from Handel’s Messiah this time of year.  The Rhode Island Philharmonic performed the piece last week, as they do each year around Christmas. 

For this month’s Artscape, Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender sat down with conductor Andy Clark, who led the philharmonic to talk about the famous piece, and how it’s come to be such a beloved holiday tradition.

Elisabeth Harrison

It’s Thanksgiving, and for many families, that means time to jump in the car and visit with relatives. If your drive is a long one, you might put on some music to entertain the kids along the way. Almost all children naturally love music.

For this month’s Rhode Island Artscape, Rhode Island Public Radio's Elisabeth Harrison visited a music class for tiny babies and toddlers, with a little something for adults too.

Pages