Boston bombing

RIPR FILE

Boston Marathon Bombing survivor Heather Abbot said she will attend the race Monday.  Abbot, who lives in Newport, lost her left leg following the blast at the finish line.

She said she’ll watch the races joined by loved ones, continuing her annual Marathon Monday tradition.

“I’ll be spending the day in Boston with my same group of friends that I’m always with, trying to create some better memories, and put that memory of 2013 in the past.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Two years after losing her left leg in the Boston Marathon bombings, Newport resident Heather Abbott is starting a foundation.  The charity will provide funds for other amputees.

Before Heather Abbott lost her leg, she says she never realized the variety of prosthetics needed for things like swimming, biking, even wearing high heels.  Or that those prosthetics can cost tens of thousands of dollars each.

Abbot said that’s important because most insurers won’t cover leg prosthetics for activities other than walking.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A little more than six months have passed since Newport resident Heather Abbott lost her leg in the Boston Marathon bombing. We’ll be checking in with Abbott for the next few months as she adjusts to life without a limb. We’ll also be exploring the growing community of amputees Abbott has joined – a community researchers say could double in the next few decades.

The August issue of Rolling Stone magazine is having some circulation problems because of the man on its cover.

CVS, Walgreen’s and Tedeschi Food Stores are refusing to sell the August issue of Rolling Stone magazine because the cover features a picture of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. 

The Woonsocket-based CVS issued a statement saying, in part, “As a company with deep roots in New England and a strong presence in Boston, we believe this is the right decision out of respect for the victims of the attack and their loved ones. “