Brett Smiley

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Jorge Elorza this afternoon will be inaugurated Providence’s mayor. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay parses the challenges the new mayor faces.

After impressive primary and general election  victories, law professor Elorza takes over the spacious second-floor office in the capital city’s Beaux-Arts City Hall. Since his election he has wisely reached out to the city’s warring political and ethnic tribes as he prepares to govern a 21st Century ancient New England port that had its beginnings in the 17th Century.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Democratic candidate Jorge Elorza is the main obstacle keeping Buddy Cianci from regaining control of City Hall in Providence. The contrast between the two men is sharp: Cianci is a legendary political figure and twice-convicted felon. Elorza is a first-time candidate and a former Providence Housing Court judge.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The Providence mayoral campaign, aka the Buddy Cianci redemption effort, is drawing national media attention. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay talks about the paths to victory for independent Cianci and Democrat Jorge Elorza.

Cianci, Elorza and Republican Dan Harrop faced off in their first campaign debate last week at Laurelmead, an East Side elderly housing complex. There was more heat than light as Elorza, a former city Housing Court judge, and Harrop, a psychiatrist, attacked Cianci’s record as one of New England’s infamously corrupt politicians.


The Providence mayoral campaign has featured more twists and turns than a Grand Prix auto race. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay on what’s next in the run for City Hall.

This we know about Providence politics: One person’s backroom deal is another person’s noble gesture.

That is what voters will decide in the September 9 Democratic primary, when the favorite, City Council president Michael Solomon, faces off against Jorge Elorza, a law professor and political neophyte. (Perennial fringe candidate Christopher Young is also in the mix).

Providence mayoral candidate Jorge Elorza joins Bonus Q+A this week to discuss his campaign and related issues, including why he considers himself the strongest Democratic challenger for Buddy Cianci in November.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Providence mayoral candidate Jorge Elorza joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss his campaign; the new Channel 12-Providence Journal findings on the race for mayor; and the state Ethics Commission's decision to review an ethics complaint against Providence City Council President Michael Solomon.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Brett Smiley ended his Providence mayoral campaign Friday and threw his support behind fellow Democrat Jorge Elorza. The decision basically sets the stage for a head-to-head September 9th primary battle between Elorza and City Council President Michael Solomon, the acknowledged front-runner in the race.

Smiley's announcement came exactly 24 hours after his latest policy proposal, a road-improvement plan touted during a news conference near the Providence train station.

Aaron Read / RIPR

With three weeks to go, the Providence mayoral campaign is heating up. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay on what to look for in the Democratic primary as the days dwindle down.

One of Rhode Island’s favorite spectator and participant sports has long been Providence mayor elections. A mélange of circus, street theater and rugby scrum, this year’s campaign is bound to land in the capital city’s political Hall of Fame, and perhaps, shame.


Just when you thought you knew the candidate field in the Providence mayoral campaign, things changed. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay’s thoughts on the capital city’s revised City Hall election.

Another week, another new twist in the Providence mayor campaign. The departure of independent Lorne Adrain from the race has set off a scramble for his supporters, most of whom hail from his home neighborhood on the city’s affluent East Side.

A plan set for release Thursday morning by Providence mayoral candidate Jorge Elorza targets a goal of doubling exports through the Port of Providence over five years -- a move, he says, that could add between 1,500 and 1,600 jobs.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Buddy Cianci says he anticipated when he jumped into the Providence mayoral race last month that it would ultimately become a two-man fight.

"I always anticipated a two-man race when I made the decision to come into the field," Cianci, who is running as an independent, tells RIPR.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

In a move to strengthen support beyond his East Side base, Providence mayoral candidate Brett Smiley unveiled an endorsement Wednesday by state Representative Ray Hull (D-Providence), a 28-year Providence police officer who lives in the same ward as rival candidate Michael Solomon and was formerly a driver for Buddy Cianci.

During a news conference at his home in the city's Mount Pleasant section, Hull said he decided to back Smiley over the two other leading Democrats, Solomon and Jorge Elorza, because of the East Sider's public safety plan.


So Buddy Cianci is back in the campaign for Providence mayor. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay reminds us that he isn’t the only candidate.

Every newsroom used to have a crusty city editor who berated young reporters. Mine was a revered Providence Journal editor named Al Johnson who barked, ``put them in the ambulance before you take them to the hospital’’ when he wanted a story about a car accident.

Heeeee’s back: Vincent A. `Buddy’ Cianci Jr., made official this afternoon what he has been talking about  for months,  that he will try for a Lazarus-like, unprecedented third comeback as Providence mayor, this time as an independent.

Providence mayoral candidate Brett Smiley joins Bonus Q+A to discuss his campaign and a host of other issues, including taxes, the city's economy, development, and more.