Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Bristol is home to the only law school in Rhode Island, at Roger Williams University . The law school is celebrating its 20th  anniversary this year. As part of Rhode Island Public Radio’s series One Square Mile looking at Bristol, education reporter Elizabeth Harrison sat down with Law School Dean, David Logan, to ask about some of the challenges the school is facing today.

John Bender / RIPR

This morning we continue our One Square Mile/Bristol series with an in depth look at the town's famous parade. It's many things, but it's not the oldest 4th of July parade in America:

Catherine Welch / RIPR

There’s a saying in public radio, that our stories create “driveway moments.” That’s when you pull into your driveway and sit in your car to hear a story to the end. Well, if you live along Route 114 in Bristol, there’s a good chance you’re having a different kind of “driveway moment” –  when you can’t get out of your driveway because there’s so much traffic. As part of our series One Square Mile, Catherine Welch checks in finds out how these Bristolians make it out of the driveway and on to their destinations.


RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay first encountered Bristol as a journalist in the 1980s and he has lived there for more than decade. In this week’s commentary, linked to our One Square Mile series on Bristol, he explains why he’ll never call himself a Bristolian, no matter how long he lives in town. 

In Bristol, as in Faulkner’s south, the past is never dead. It isn’t even past.  History and the sparkling waters of Narragansett and Mount Hope bays have defined a community that is more than three centuries old.


Roger Williams University is reporting success with a new marketing tool. The tuition guarantee program takes the guesswork out of going to college.

Roger Williams University now offers all students a tuition guarantee. It’s an assurance that tuition will remain the same for all four years of an undergraduate’s education, provided the student stays enrolled continuously. University president Donald Farish said it’s not only increased the quality and size of their freshman class, but has boosted the freshman to sophomore retention rate from 78 to 84 percent.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

After serving an unprecedented 11 years as the dean of Roger Williams University Law School, David Logan, is stepping down.

Logan came to the school in 2003 to assume the deanship after teaching law at Wake Forest University School of Law North Carolina.

During his tenure Logan says he is most proud of improving the Roger Williams pass rate for the Bar exam.


The governor’s office is asking you, the public, about what it’s like to live and work in the Ocean State. Residents are being asked to speak their minds at a series of public forums this week.

The forums are part of an initiative out of the governor’s office called RhodeMap RI. It’s a project analyzing the state’s business climate and economic competitiveness. The goal is to travel across the state, listen to residents about what it’s like to get job, buy a home and get an education in the state, then use that feedback to develop policy.

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A worker who fell from the Mt Hope Bridge Tuesday has died, according to the Rhode Island Turnpike and Bridge Authority. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is investigating the accident.

OSHA/Rhode Island director Patrick Griffin said a worker fell 30 feet while scaffolding was being removed after a painting job.  The Rhode Island Turnpike and Bridge Authority said it was 70 feet. He landed on the deck of the bridge.

The accident happened at around 8:30am Tuesday and was reported to OSHA at 9:00 am.

An old Rhode Island summer tradition – Governor’s Bay Day – will be celebrated Sunday July 27th with free parking at all state beaches.

Lite 105 and 92 Pro FM radio stations will be broadcasting from Roger Wheeler and Scarborough state beaches as part of the bay celebration.

Governor’s Bay Day has been celebrated since 1989. It began in response to the World Prodigy oil spill and to highlight the quality and fragility of Narragansett Bay.

Catherine Welch / RIPR

On the other side of the state from Bristol, the irreverent Ancients and Horribles parade made its way through Chepachet. Gov. Lincoln Chafee was there, so were Providence Mayor Angel Taveras, Senator Jack Reed and Congressman Jim Langevin. They lead the parade, which included floats making political statements about Obamacare and genetically modified foods. There were also veterans, clowns, marching bands and a stream of fire trucks.