Brown University

Brown To Host Conference For First-Gen Students

Feb 26, 2015

First-generation college students will gather at a conference this weekend at Brown University. This conference is the first of its kind, bringing administrators and students from all the Ivy League schools together.

First-generation college students come from families where neither of their parents attended four-year universities. Manuel Contreras is co-founder of the student group 1vyG, hosting the conference. He says first-generation students often struggle to adapt to their new academic environments. They are less likely to apply for internships or ask for help.

A portion of the roof at Brown University's Pizzitola Sports Center has collapsed under the weight of heavy snow.

The roof was made out of fabric, and the collapse affected the tennis facility at the complex.

Brown officials say no one was injured in the collapse, which happened in the early hours of Wednesday morning.

According to Brown, this is the second time the Pizzitola roof has given way under snow. The first time was in 2011.

The company that designed and installed the new roof is looking into the problem.

Brown University has raised tuition for the coming school year by 4.4 percent. A year of undergraduate tuition and fees at Brown will now top $62,000.

The Brown Corporation made the decision at its annual winter meeting over the weekend. The corporation also approved an 8 percent increase in financial aid spending to help offset the tuition increase.

Brown's 2016 budget includes a $4.4 million dollar operating deficit, which will be covered by university reserves. This is the third year in a row that Brown has operated with a deficit.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Providence

Feb 3, 2015

A sense of place.  Community.  Roots.  Some of us spend a lifetime trying to figure out where we’re from, who we are, where we belong.  Oliver Wendell Holmes – the poet and physician whose son became a U.S. Supreme Court Justice – once wrote, “Where we love is home, home that our feet may leave, but not our hearts.”  We hear from Ria Mirchandani about her fruitful search for a sense of home as she forges her path in life.


Ria Mirchandani is a senior at Brown University.  She was born in Nashua, New Hampshire, raised in Mumbai, India, and has come of age in Providence.

Catherine Welch / RIPR

The International Writers Project at Brown University presents a 2-day festival of Cuban writing and music on Feb. 4th and 5th. Called "Cuba In Splinters:  New Fiction from Generation Zero," it honors the Cuban writer and blogger Orlando Luis Pardo Lazo. Rhode Island Public Radio's Chuck Hinman spoke to Orlando Luis about the festival and contemporary Cuban literature. 

Dr. Stanley Aronson, the founding dean of Brown University’s Alpert School of Medicine, a prolific writer, advocate for community organizations and one of Rhode Island’s most prominent public intellectuals,  died this morning. He was 92.

Aronson, whose career spanned more than 70 years, was a world-renowned doctor, medical researcher and leader in medical education. A genial, generous man, Aronson served as mentor to generations of physicians and medical students.

Steve Emerson, a self-styled terrorism expert, who has drawn fire for comments about "no-go zones" in France and other European countries following the attacks in Paris, graduated from Brown University.

In response to recommendations from a university panel, Brown has announced it will immediately begin using trained investigators to look into allegations of sexual misconduct on campus.

The university said other changes include the assigning of a dean to any student involved in the campus hearing process, and a new website to provide resources on sexual assault.

Brown has been reviewing its policy for handling allegations of sexual assault after a student went public with her concerns about the process.

Brian Moynihan, CEO of Bank of America, is this year’s featured speaker at Central Congregational Church’s annual Darrell West Lecture Series on Religion and Politics. The event, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for Thursday, February 12 at 6 p.m. at the church, which is located at 296 Angell  St., in Providence.


Brown University has sanctioned two fraternities, saying they created an environment that "facilitated sexual misconduct" by failing to monitor parties and failing to properly safeguard the service of alcohol.

Phi Kappa Psi will loose recognition for four years, including the loss of its housing, effective immediately.

Sigma Chi has been sanctioned with probation until fall 2016. The fraternity cannot sponsor social events, or conduct recruitment, rush, or initiation processes.

Jake Harper / RIPR

We're wrapping up our months-long series about one of the greatest public health challenges facing Rhode Island: hepatitis C. Listen online or download our one-hour special: "At the Crossroads: The Rise of Hepatitis C and the Fight to Stop It."

Go behind the series:

Eighty years ago, Rhode Island Democrats took over state government with one fell swoop in a coup that became known as the Bloodless Revolution. The event has set the template for Rhode Island politics ever since.

In just 14 minutes at the State House on New Year’s Day, 1935, the Democrats took control of the General Assembly, replaced the entire Rhode Island Supreme Court,  consigned to the dustbin of history more than 80 boards and commissions and fired Republican appointees who had run state government forever.


The grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri reviewed thousands of pages of evidence surrounding the shooting death of an unarmed black man. Among those pages: lots of inscrutable medical terminology from an autopsy and other medical reports. That’s why a group of Brown University medical students decided to translate that jargon into everyday language. Third year medical student Rian Yalamanchili led the “Ferguson Decoded” project.

What happens in the deep seafloor, west of Costa Rica, may unlock some mysteries about what happens in Narragansett Bay.

A biology professor at Brown University recently dove in the submersible Alvin, operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and owned by the U.S. Navy, to collect samples of microbes from openings in the Pacific sea floor, from where heated water flows. These seafloor openings are known as hydrothermal vents.

Jeremy Rich said he wants to better understand how fast microbes grow here.

Jay Dickson / Brown University/University of Texas/National Science Foundation

Monitoring how the climate is changing in Antarctica’s most stable environments, the desert valleys, is very difficult. But that’s what Jay Dickson, a staff scientist at Brown University’s Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, is trying to do, using time-lapse photography.