One day after learning his non-Hodgkins lymphoma is in remission, Red Sox Manager John Farrell says he is feeling grateful.

During a Friday afternoon conference call with reporters, Farrell said he's recovering after treatment.

"Basically there was six months of chemo given in an eight week period," Farrell said. "That was to combat the aggressive nature of the cancer."

Farrell described the treatment regimen as "pretty intense."

"It beat me up physically, but honestly right now, feeling pretty darn good."

National Institutes of Health

When Rhode Island health officials rolled out a new immunization requirement for seventh graders this fall, they weren’t expecting controversy. The vaccine for HPV, or human papillomavirus, protects against a sexually transmitted infection that causes most cervical, anal, and throat cancers. But a small but vocal group of opponents say the state shouldn’t mandate the HPV vaccine, and they’re taking the fight to the statehouse.

The National Institutes of Health has awarded another round of millions of dollars in research funding to two of Rhode Island’s major teaching hospitals. Rhode Island Hospital and Women and Infants are using the money to study cancer and fetal development.

This is the third and final phase of NIH funding for programs called Centers for Biological Research Excellence, or COBRE, at each hospital.

NPR's All Things Considered host Audie Cornish interviewed a prominent cancer doctor Monday about his public criticism of the high cost of cancer drugs.

Mayo Clinic

Governor Lincoln Chafee has signed legislation that requires health care providers to tell women if they have dense breast tissue. The law is aimed at helping detect cancers a mammogram might miss.

Dense breast tissue is pretty common, especially in younger women. The issue is that dense tissue can make it more difficult for a mammogram to “see” cancerous growths. You may not be able to tell whether your breasts are made up of more dense tissue, but a radiologist can see it on a mammogram.

That's a question only you and your doctor can answer. But news that a major, long-term study found no link between early screening (i.e., mammograms) and reduced deaths from breast cancer may have muddied the waters. So here are a few thoughts and resources to help shed some light.

Former Providence Mayor Vincent `Buddy’ Cianci Jr., is being treated at Miriam Hospital for rectal cancer. Cianci, WPRO’s chief talk show host and a political analyst for ABC 6 said in a news release, ``I have been absent from the airwaves for the past week due to hospitalization for a recent diagnosis of cancer.’’

Cianci, 73,  said that medical opinions indicate that ``the cancer is completely curable’’ and that the prognosis ``is for a full recovery.’’

National Program of Cancer Registries / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) has helped pass a new cancer research law that targets pancreatic and other hard-to-treat cancers. Whitehouse lost his own mother to pancreatic cancer several years ago. The legislation aims to boost early detection and treatment.

Rhode Island Department of Health

Rhode Island Department of Health director Dr. Michael Fine says Rhode Island must address prescription drug abuse. Fine’s comments come as part of a list of priorities he’s shared with lawmakers.

Topping the list: ending deaths from prescription drug overdoses and colorectal cancer, as well as curbing the transmission of new HIV cases in Rhode Island. Fine also wants to reduce the number of premature births and C-section deliveries.