cancer

The National Institutes of Health has awarded another round of millions of dollars in research funding to two of Rhode Island’s major teaching hospitals. Rhode Island Hospital and Women and Infants are using the money to study cancer and fetal development.

This is the third and final phase of NIH funding for programs called Centers for Biological Research Excellence, or COBRE, at each hospital.

NPR's All Things Considered host Audie Cornish interviewed a prominent cancer doctor Monday about his public criticism of the high cost of cancer drugs.

Mayo Clinic

Governor Lincoln Chafee has signed legislation that requires health care providers to tell women if they have dense breast tissue. The law is aimed at helping detect cancers a mammogram might miss.

Dense breast tissue is pretty common, especially in younger women. The issue is that dense tissue can make it more difficult for a mammogram to “see” cancerous growths. You may not be able to tell whether your breasts are made up of more dense tissue, but a radiologist can see it on a mammogram.

That's a question only you and your doctor can answer. But news that a major, long-term study found no link between early screening (i.e., mammograms) and reduced deaths from breast cancer may have muddied the waters. So here are a few thoughts and resources to help shed some light.

Former Providence Mayor Vincent `Buddy’ Cianci Jr., is being treated at Miriam Hospital for rectal cancer. Cianci, WPRO’s chief talk show host and a political analyst for ABC 6 said in a news release, ``I have been absent from the airwaves for the past week due to hospitalization for a recent diagnosis of cancer.’’

Cianci, 73,  said that medical opinions indicate that ``the cancer is completely curable’’ and that the prognosis ``is for a full recovery.’’

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