Cranston mayor

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Once again, Rhode Islanders have elected a governor with far less than a majority of the vote. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders what we can do about this.

The boisterous cheers among delirious Democrats crammed into the Providence Biltmore’s 17th floor ballroom on election night have barely quieted. You can’t blame them for hoisting drinks and shouting themselves hoarse:  Gina Raimondo became the first woman to win election as Rhode Island's  governor and the only Democrat to capture the state’s highest elected office since 1992.


Why have political campaigns become so relentlessly negative? RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says it reflects the cynicism of the times and the way political money is raised and spent.

Click the television remote as many times as you like but don’t expect to escape the nasty political spots running nonstop until the polls close tomorrow. Hike to the mailbox and you’re greeted by an avalanche of political flyers spreading dirt on one politician or another. Ditto for the Internet.

In a joust that broke little new ground, Ken Block and Cranston Mayor Allan Fung hammered away at each other tonight in a WPRI-Channel 12-Providence Journal televised debate that came a week before their September 9 Republican gubernatorial showdown.

From the No Republican Ever Lost a Gubernatorial Primary Vote by Slamming the RI General Assembly Department: Cranston Mayor Allan Fung blasted the Assembly in a campaign press release today, saying the annual late rush to legislation created too many ``missed opportunities for Rhode Island.’’

This week brings crucial developments in the 2014 Rhode Island governor’s race: tomorrow a WPRI-Providence Journal public opinion survey releases veteran pollster Joe Fleming’s numbers on the race. Then on Wednesday, the most important new twist comes when the legal settlement in the 2011 state public employee pension overhaul is made public.