Department of Environmental Management

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Scientists at the University of Rhode Island (URI) have helped solve the mystery blast at Salty Brine beach. The likely source of the explosion was the combustion of hydrogen gas, which was produced by a disconnected copper cable underneath the beach. That cable, owned by the U.S. Coast Guard, used to power a navigational light at the end of the jetty.

The explosion didn’t leave behind any chemical residues, which told scientists to home in on clean-burning gases, such as methane or hydrogen.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Department of Environmental Management has announced the closure of two areas in Charlestown; trails through East Beach and Ninigret Conservation Area. The trails are closed as of Tuesday, to protect Piping Plover nesting areas. 

The small shore bird is endangered and makes its home in the Ocean State.

Wikimedia Commons

The town of Westerly plans to spray for mosquitoes Friday. Helicopters will drop granules of mosquito larvicide on about 500 acres in Chapman Swamp. 

 

The scrap metal recycling company on the Providence waterfront that the state is suing for alleged environmental violations, is scheduled to be back in Court later this morning. The Court will issue a few orders.

The state attorney general’s office and the Department of Environmental Management jointly filed a lawsuit against Rhode Island Recycled Metals. These two state agencies are asking the Court to order the company to clean up and recap the scrap metal yard, a former Superfund site.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo’s budget proposal includes some new initiatives for the environment, including a larger role for the state’s Clean Water Finance Agency. Rhode Island Public Radio’s environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza spoke with Rhode Island Public Radio's Elisabeth Harrison to discuss the environmental impact of the budget.

Pages