diabetes

Benjamin Bouvier, Elliott Liebling / RIPR

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates nearly a third of Americans are pre-diabetic. Many more are already diabetic. 

Graphic: Benjamin Bouvier, Elliott Liebling

The rate of diabetes among Latinos in Rhode Island has shot up faster than any other group. Why the disparity in health between this group and others? It's a tangle of problems scientists don’t entirely understand.

Graphic: Benjamin Bouvier, Elliott Liebling

Diabetes rates are soaring across the nation. But in Rhode Island, the Hispanic population has seen the most dramatic increase of any other group over the past few years.

Diabetes is on the rise across the country, but in Rhode Island, Latinos appear to face a greater risk.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s Kristin Gourlay joins News Director Elisabeth Harrison to talk about her upcoming series on diabetes in Rhode Island's Latino community.

RIPR FILE

A Brown University engineering professor has been recognized for her work inventing better ways to deliver drugs into the human body, including an innovation that may help diabetics.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

On this World Diabetes Day, I decided to look into the prevalence of diabetes in Rhode Island and find out whether diagnoses are on the rise. They are, unsurprisingly. Check out this interactive map from the CDC that shows the increase in diabetes rates over time in each Rhode Island county.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Parents everywhere may be looking forward to dipping into that plastic pumpkin to sneak a Halloween treat tonight – and for several nights to come. Is that so bad?

Not necessarily, according to Johnson and Wales University pediatric nutrition expert Barbara Robinson. She joined us in the studio to talk about Halloween candy, along with a giant bag of "fun size" treats.

Looking for a little something to read over the long weekend? Try the Rhode Island Medical Society's Rhode Island Medical Journal, now online and totally free.

Some of the articles are for a scholarly audience, but I found lots of interest and think others who aren't physicians or researchers will, too.