dish

Engineer's Corner
7:25 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

TheEC: New STL Dish at 88.1 - INSTALLED!

New 950MHz microwave STL dish being installed on WELH tower in Seekonk.
Credit Aaron Read RIPR

UPDATE @ 1pm : 88.1FM is back at normal power!  Pics are available on our Twitter feed here, here, here and here.   By the way, many of these pics were taken with a stock iPhone 5S using this telephoto lens attachment.  Pretty good for $45!

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On Wednesday June 18th, beginning around 9:30 or 10am, 88.1FM will be running on the backup transmitter & antenna for a few hours to install new equipment on the top of the tower.   We must run on the lower-power backup for the health & safety of our tower climber.

The backup operates using a one-bay vertically-polarized omnidirectional antenna and about one-tenth our normal power.   

THIS WILL NOT IMPACT OUR 91.5 OR 102.7FM SIGNALS, NOR OUR WEBCAST.

Keep watching our Twitter feed for updates.

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Engineer's Corner
3:00 am
Tue October 15, 2013

TheEC: More Fiber in RIPR's Diet

Fiberoptic cable splicing tool.
Credit Aaron Read

As all RIPR fans know, we are an NPR member station.  That means we get a lot of our programming from NPR, the BBC, and other providers, via our satellite dish.   The dish is medium-sized as dishes go, but it’s pretty big in real terms: 3.7 meters (12ft) in diameter.   There’s quite literally nowhere to fit a dish that large at our studios in 1 Union Station, so instead it was installed out at our 1290AM transmitter site in North Providence (we still own 1290, but we lease it to Latino Public R

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Engineer's Corner
7:56 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

TheEC: "Normal Accidents"

Jack Lemmon in The China Syndrome

Most people have heard of the "Three Mile Island" nuclear power plant accident of 1979.  But it's famous among engineers for being a "normal accident", in that there wasn't any one thing that nearly caused a meltdown of catastrophic proportions...it was a series of little things inside a highly complex system that all happened as part of "normal" operations.   None of which, by themselves, was terribly problematic.  But they all happened at once, and that was a problem.

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