downtown Providence

The Providence Biltmore has completed a multi-million dollar renovation of its historic lobby and guest rooms, and other parts of the hotel.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s Scott MacKay said the 1922 hotel has a prominent place in Rhode Island political history, including several stays by John F. Kennedy.

The first Providence International Arts Festival, held last weekend, was such a success that Mayor Jorge Elorza is moving ahead with plans for another such celebration next year, said mayoral spokesman David Ortiz.

Thousands thronged a downtown transformed into a giant music stage and pedestrian arts mall last Saturday and Sunday. ``It met our expectations and we’re looking to grow it in the future,’’ said Ortiz.

The weather cooperated both days as the sun washed over downtown. ``We did get lucky,’’ acknowledged Ortiz.

John Bender / RIPR

A live camel made a quick stop in middle of downtown Providence this afternoon.  The eight-foot tall animal was visiting from Roger Williams Park Zoo, and greeted passersby in Kennedy Plaza. 

The zoo brought him out to drum up buzz for a new ‘ride-a-camel’ exhibit, and, of course, celebrate hump day.

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RIPR FILE

New details are emerging about a major arts festival scheduled in Providence this summer. The event is part of Mayor Jorge Elorza’s plan to develop the city into an artistic tourist destination. 

  

                

John Bender / RIPR

Roger Williams University is expanding its presence in Providence.  The school is moving into the former home of 38 Studios.

One Empire Plaza is best known as the headquarters for the now defunct videogame company 38 Studios. The building will house the Roger Williams; center for continuing studies, graduate programs, and the Latino Policy Insititute. President Donald Farish said the new location will better serve adult and non-traditional students.  “If we were doing things out of Bristol, we’d simply become inaccessible to huge portions of the state.”

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