general assembly

Aaron Read / RIPR

Rhode Island is among a small number of states that don’t have a gubernatorial line-item veto.Advocates are pressing lawmakers to take up the issue in the next legislative session.

Supporters say the line-item veto brings more accountability to the budget process. They say that’s especially important in Rhode Island, which has a particularly powerful legislature.

Googie Man / Creative Commons

Curt Schilling said Tuesday he was surprised to learn in 2010 that most of state reps voting on a $125 million job development program were unaware that a big chunk of the money was "earmarked" for 38 Studios.


Our Rhody Votes 2016 coverage continues, with a look at Ballot Question 2, the Rhode Island Ethics Commission Amendment. It asks voters whether to restore the Commission’s jurisdiction over General Assembly members. 

Your humble correspondent is back on the beat after taking most of last week off. So thanks for stopping by. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and your can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Brett Smiley, chief of staff for Governor Gina Raimondo, joins Bonus Q&A to discuss a range of issues facing the state, including truck tolls, car taxes, his priorities, and much more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

After being defeated by 21 votes during the September primary, John DeSimone unveiled Wednesday a write-in campaign against Marcia Ranglin-Vassell, and said he's running because out-of-town special interests propelled his rival's victory.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Lewd comments made by Trump 11 years ago have led some congressional Republicans to back away from the GOP nominee. The head of the state Republican Party says he’s not worried that Donald Trump may hurt efforts to increase GOP ranks in the General Assembly.

State GOP Chairman Brandon Bell says Trump’s recently publicized remarks about women are indefensible and unacceptable. But Bell said local voters can separate Trump from the issues backed by Rhode Island Republicans.

Ian Donnis

Americans remain sharply divided in the run-up to the presidential election next month. One issue raised repeatedly during this campaign is immigration, and what it means to be an American. 

October beckons, with playoff baseball, autumnal beauty, and the run-up to the deciding of legislative races. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. (A quick program note: I'm taking most of next week off, so TGIF will probably not return until October 14.) Here we go.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

The National Rifle Association's Political Victory Fund is using its general election endorsements to mostly support General Assembly incumbents, although the group also backs a challenger to one House incumbent, and favors Republican candidates in the races for three of six open House seats.

In Cranston, the NRA's Political Victory Fund supported House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello (with an A+ rating) over GOP challenger Steven Frias (who has a B rating.)

Happy Weekend, and thanks for stopping by. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Superior Court Judge Michael Silverstein approved Friday the latest settlement over the failure of 38 Studios. Under terms of the deal, an insurance policy for Curt Schilling and three other company executives will pay the state $2.5 million.

The settlement was announced earlier this week. The mediator in the case said given the uncertainty of a trial, it was better for the state to accept the settlement.

State Rep. Aaron Regunberg (D-Providence) joins Bonus Q&A to discuss the House of Representatives, racial profiling, the Burrillville power plan proposal, and other issues.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

State Rep. Aaron Regunberg (D-Providence) joins Political Roundtable to discuss the outlook for progressives in the General Assembly after recent primary victories; Governor Raimondo's focus on education; and the latest settlement involving 38 Studios.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Former Red Sox star Curt Schilling and three other former 38 Studios executives have reached a preliminary $2.5 million settlement with the State of Rhode Island over the failure of the video-game company in 2012.