general assembly

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Faced with Republican efforts to remove state Rep. John Carnevale's name from the fall ballot, the state Board of Elections on Monday called for the Providence Board of Canvassers to first resolve whether Carnevale can legally vote within his Providence district.

RI House of Representatives

Rhode Island Working Families, the newish progressive group, has made six legislative endorsements, as part of the group's aspiration to be "a major force" in September primaries for the General Assembly.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

In his first public remarks since returning from a Canadian vacation last week, House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello called the most recent revelations about state Rep. John Carnevale "unacceptable," while saying it's up to voters to decide the fate of the embattled Providence lawmaker.

"As the news broke in the media about Representative Carnevale this past week, I frankly agree with the sentiments of the public who are tired of these types of stories," Mattiello said in a statement released by his campaign spokeswoman, Patti Doyle. "And I am too! This behavior is unacceptable."

Your humble correspondent is back on the beat. So thanks for stopping by. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Forty-one of Rhode Island's 113 part-time lawmakers, or about 36 percent, have a free pass to another term in the General Assembly.

Sam Bell, state coordinator of the Rhode Island Progressive Democrats, joins Bonus Q&A to discuss the possibility of a progressive challenger to Gina Raimondo in 2018; the fight in RI over abortion rights; using subsidies for economic development and much more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Sam Bell, state coordinator of the Rhode Island Progressive Democrats, joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss the progressive push to win more legislative seats; more fallout in the residency case involving state Rep. John Carnevale; and this week's Republican National Convention.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The FBI has seized about $810,000 in assets under the control of former state Rep. Ray Gallison, a Bristol Democrat, who stepped down in May as chairman of the House Finance Committee.

In an online posting earlier this week, the FBI revealed that it seized the assets under Gallison’s control. Some of the money was part of the estate of a friend of Gallison’s from Barrington who died in 2012. That individual, Ray Medley, had hired Gallison to handle the liquidation of his estate.

The state Ethics Commission voted unanimously Tuesday to adopt a moratorium on outside ethics complaints in the 90 days before a general election.

The moratorium is intended to discourage politically motivated complaints, although the commission reserves the right to launch its own investigations or complaints, commission spokesman Jason Gramitt said.

Common Cause of Rhode Island, Operation Clean Government, and the League of Women Voters supported the moratorium, Gramitt said.

John Bender / RIPR

State Representative John Carnevale maintains his primary residence is in Providence, the city he represents at the General Assembly. Carnevale testified during a hearing Wednesday at the Providence Board of Canvassers.  His residence came under scrutiny following reports by WPRI-TV that the lawmaker appears to live in Johnston.

What a heartrending week in America. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. Your tips and comments and tips are always welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

State Republican Chairman Brandon Bell joins Bonus Q&A to discuss the RI GOP's plans for 2018, his upcoming trip to the Republican National Convention, and the Republican legislative fight against House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

State Republican Chairman Brandon Bell joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss the FBI report on Hillary Clinton, the latest Donald Trump controversy, and the outlook for increasing GOP ranks in the General Assembly.

Supporters of Linda Finn, a former state rep seeking a comeback this fall, are crying foul after the state Democratic Party endorsed rival Democrat James Cawley in the race for the District 72 seat.

State Democratic Chairman Joseph McNamara, a rep from Warwick, could not be reached for comment.

Party spokeswoman Ann Gooding offered this explanation for why Cawley got the Democratic endorsement instead of a former rep: "Cawley asked for that endorsement, Finn did not."

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea said the state's newly signed lobbying law will enable the state to pursue cases of unregistered lobbying.

Governor Gina Raimondo signed the lobbying bill into law Wednesday morning. That came a little more than a year after Gorbea's office dropped unregistered lobbying cases against two figures linked to 38 Studios, Michael Corso and Thomas Zaccagnino, due to flaws in the state's lobbying law.

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