general assembly

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Republican challenger Steven Frias edged Democratic House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello in voting Tuesday, but Mattiello said he received more than enough mail ballots to ensure him a victory. With the mail ballots yet to be certified by the state Board of Elections, Frias did not concede defeat.

Unofficial results showed Frias beat Mattiello by 147 voters through tallies cast on voting machines. Mattiello's campaign team said the speaker was the choice of more than 500 people who used mail ballots to vote, in what they called an insurance policy for a Mattiello victory.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Democrats have dominated the General Assembly since the 1930s. So will an angry electorate produce Republican gains on Smith Hill?

Let’s start in House District 12, which includes the heavily Latino Washington Park section of Providence. Being able to speak Spanish comes in handy when independent state rep candidate Luis Vargas goes knocking on doors in search of votes.

Fasten your seatbelt for what promises to be an impactful Election Day next Tuesday. In the meantime, thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your comments and tips are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

State Rep. Blake Filippi (I-New Shoreham) joins Bonus Q&A to discuss the volume of independents running for the General Assembly, the constitutionality of truck tolls, how power might be more widely shared in the House of Representatives, and much more.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR


Lookout RI's endorsement of House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello through an advertisement in the Cranston Herald may violate an IRS ban on campaign activity by 501(c)(3) organizations.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The speaker of the House is often called the most powerful elected official in state government. That’s because the speaker controls the flow of legislation in the House and has a lot of influence over the state budget. But just like a rank and file lawmaker, the speaker has to win re-election every two years.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

State Republican Chairman Brandon Bell filed a complaint with the state Elections Board on Monday, calling on the board to investigate a possible campaign finance violation by House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello.

We're heading into the home stretch ahead of Rhode Island's November 8th election. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ward 14 Providence Councilor David Salvatore joins Bonus Q&A to talk about city finances, the proposed agreement with city firefighters, whether Providence's influence at the legislature is waning, and other topics.

It's not every week that begins with 38 Studios and ends with a yoga pants dispute in Barrington. But that's why Rhode Island is the gift that keeps giving. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips are welcome and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

University of Rhode Island President David Dooley joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss Curt Schilling's comments on 38 Studios; ballot question 4, which would allocate $45 million in borrowing to modernize an engineering building at URI and create a so-called innovation campus; and what do about student debt.

Aaron Read / RIPR

Rhode Island is among a small number of states that don’t have a gubernatorial line-item veto.Advocates are pressing lawmakers to take up the issue in the next legislative session.

Supporters say the line-item veto brings more accountability to the budget process. They say that’s especially important in Rhode Island, which has a particularly powerful legislature.

Googie Man / Creative Commons

Curt Schilling said Tuesday he was surprised to learn in 2010 that most of state reps voting on a $125 million job development program were unaware that a big chunk of the money was "earmarked" for 38 Studios.

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