gun control

Flo Jonic / RIPR

State officials plan to roll out a package of bills Tuesday in an attempt to reduce gun-related violence. Lawmakers and law enforcement officials have been discussing the issue since January.

Rhode Island is among the states considering more stringent gun laws after the school shooting last year in Newtown, Connecticut. The local response will come in a package of nine bills. The proposals are expected to include such topics as background checks, weapons sales, and mental health.

Senator Jack Reed says he thinks background checks would be effective in curbing gun violence. The New York Times reports that opposition to background checks is holding back federal gun control legislation.

Reed says he hopes background checks stay in the bill. “You know if we can’t get the background checks through there’s not much we’re doing in response to one of the great tragedies of recent years,” says Reed.

Rhode Island lawmakers will consider legislation Wednesday aimed at increasing safety measures in public schools. The bills, now in the House and Senate Education Committees, would require school and law enforcement officials to work together to look for weaknesses in building security and craft new school safety plans.

Friday, March 15, 2013

Mar 15, 2013

Senator Sheldon Whitehouse talks proposed gun control legislation.  Students ask adults to take the NECAP test.  These stories and more on the RIPR morning news podcast.

Plus,  Moderate Party founder Ken Block is this week's guest on the Political Roundtable.

Do you have insight or expertise on this topic? Please email us, we'd like to hear from you.  news@ripr.org

Brown University kicks off a lecture series on gun violence today with a talk from Carl Bogus, professor of law at Roger Williams University Law School. Bogus will discuss efforts to reduce crime and the effects guns and gun crime have on communities.

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Feb 28, 2013

Higher education is bracing for possible cuts in research funding.    A representative of the NRA says RI does not need any more regulation to control gun violence.  These stories and more on the RIPR Morning News Podcast.  Plus...

The list is long of potential implications to RI if the so-called sequestration kicks in, from longer lines at the airport to job loss to less educational research.  Scott MacKay reviews what might be in our future.

Guns and lies

Feb 19, 2013
Gun Appreciation Day

No word yet on how Rhode Island might address the growing debate about gun control and violence prevention. My colleague Ian Donnis and I have been covering the issue (see some related stories, below), and so far we know there's talk of proposing legislation (no details yet) and a vague working group of lawmakers and policymakers discussing the issues. Those issues probably include Rhode Island's participation in a national gun background check database and how to use mental health records when it comes to allowing firearms purchases.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Law enforcement officials have tried without success for years to make Rhode Island’s gun laws more stringent. They say tougher laws would help to deter gun-related violence. Now, in the aftermath of the massacre in Newtown, Connecticut, the question remains whether Rhode Island will beef up its gun laws. For starters, gun control supporters will have to overcome powerful opposition from the National Rifle Association.

Cicilline lashes out against NRA ad

Jan 21, 2013

(PROVIDENCE, RI) Congressman David Cicilline is lashing out at the National Rifle Association for an ad it unveiled this week critical of the protection afforded the President’s two daughters.  In a letter to supporters, Cicilline calls it a “new low” and says petty personal attacks have no place in the public debate on gun violence prevention. “The NRA doesn’t want to have a serious discussion on gun violence,” Cicilline says,  adding  “they just want to drag things into the gutter.”  

U-S Senator from Rhode Island Jack Reed
Jack Reed

(PROVIDENCE, RI) The President rolled out a plan last week to curb gun violence, and Electric Boat announced more jobs are on the way for its facility in Quonset. These are just a few topics Rhode Island Public Radio’s Scott MacKay touched on when he sat down with Senator Jack Reed.


Do you have insight or expertise on this topic? Please email us, we'd like to hear from you.  news@ripr.org

(PROVIDENCE, R.I.) Providence Public Safety Commissioner Steven Pare says the state can reduce gun-related violence by passing more stringent laws. Pare says most of the guns used for crime are illegally owned.

Pare says tougher penalties for illegal gun possession helped to dramatically reduce gun-related crime in New York City. He says more stringent punishments could help to have the same effect in Rhode Island.

Donna Perry, Executive Director RI State Coalition
Ian Donnis

The political aftermath of the Newtown school shooting, and John Robitaille  takes himself out of the Republican field for governor in 2014.  That’s part of the discussion this week on Political Roundtable. With our host, Rhode Island Public Radio political reporter Ian Donnis, Rhode Island Public Radio political analyst Scott Mackay, University of Rhode Island political science professor Maureen Moakley and special guest Donna Perry Executive Director of the RI Statewide Coalition.

Providence Mayor Angel Taveras says he plans to join other mayors across the state in staging a gun buy-back program on a yet-to-be-determined date in January.

"If we can avoid just one accident, one instance, it's well worth it to me to have the buy-back," Taveras said in an interview. "I've seen violence and what it can do to a community -- obviously seen it first-hand here in Providence."

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