Addieville East Farm in Burrillville, Rhode Island is a haven for sport hunting, and has gained an international reputation. And as part of our Series One Square Mile: Burrillville, Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender reports, running this massive operation is labor of love.

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Congressman David Cicilline joins Political Roundtable to discuss efforts to reduce gun violence; fallout from Tuesday's Democratic presidential debate; and the GOP search for a new House speaker.

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A group of University of Rhode Island professors are urging the administration to equip campus police with body cameras.

The URI chapter of the American Association of University Professors, says the school should join the national trend. They say about a third of police officers in the U.S. have body cameras. The group also points to the relative affordability of the cameras, which usually run fewer than $500 dollars each.

URI voted to arm campus police last year, the force was armed this past Spring.

A new law takes effect today aimed at keeping guns out of the hands of the seriously mentally ill. The state will now begin sending more information to a national criminal background check database.

Anyone who wants to buy a gun from a gun store must submit to a background check. Store owners run the buyer’s information through a few national databases, including the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, or NICS. Until recently, Rhode Island shared only criminal records with NICS.

It depends on what you define as progress, or on what you define as an acceptable risk.

Every two years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention puts out results from its latest Youth Risk Behavior Survey, or YRBS. Teens are surveyed about all kinds of risky and healthy behaviors, from how likely they are to wear a bike helmet to whether or not they've eaten fruits or vegetables in the past week, as well as the usual suspects like smoking and unprotected sex.

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin joins Bonus Q+A to talk about 38 Studios, Deepwater Wind, gun violence and gun control, and a host of other issues.

State Senator Dawson Hodgson (R-North Kingstown), the Republican candidate for attorney general joins Bonus Q&A to discuss unanswered questions about 38 Studios, his challenge to AG Peter Kilmartin, his effort to impose stiffer sentences for illegally possessing a gun, and many other issues.

State Representative Michael Marcello (D-Scituate) joins Bonus Q+A to talk about his fight for the speakership with Nicholas Mattiello and a host of other issues, including guns, ethics, the budget outlook, and more.

A state task force is calling for a change in Rhode Island law, saying the state should contribute mental health records to a national background check database called NICS. The firearms safety task force says Rhode Island should provide records only in limited cases in which a person is involuntarily committed by the courts and poses a significant risk of violence.

Records would not be submitted for people determined to pose only a low risk of violence. And the task force says the state should avoid providing any specific information about a patient's diagnosis.

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State Representative Deborah Ruggiero (D-Jamestown) joins Political Roundtable this week to talk about a legislative panel looking at the link between mental health and firearms; a new state Senate report on the addressing the skills gap; and developments in the race for governor.

The year ended as 2013 began: with Rhode Island's political/media class fixated on the looming race for governor in 2014. At least we're a bit closer now. With that in mind, welcome back to my weekly column. Your tips and thoughts are always welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and your cordially invited to follow me on the twitters. Let's get to it.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Democratic Secretary of State candidate Guillaume de Ramel joins us on Political Roundtable this week to discuss his campaign; Gina Raimondo's entry in the race for governor; and possible fallout from the recall election defeated in Exeter.

Get ready for the first serious snow of the year, and a storm of a different sorts in Exeter. Welcome back to my weekly column. As always, feel free to drop me a line at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org and to follow me on the twitters. Let's get to it.

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Voters head to the polls in Exeter on Saturday for a recall election that could send a majority of the town council packing. 

The recall was sparked by a dispute over gun permits.  It started after four out of five town councilors supported a move to put permits for concealed weapons in the hands of the attorney general instead of the town clerk.

Rhode Island Public Radio's Elisabeth Harrison sat down with political analyst Scott MacKay to find out what's at stake in this unusual election.

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Voters in Exeter will go to the polls this Saturday to decide whether to keep or kick out four of the five members on the town council. The recall election was sparked by a request from four councilors who voted to ask the General Assembly to change how gun permits are issued in Exeter. Although the legislature never took up the request, advocates for gun rights responded by organizing the recall. The fight in Exeter shows how attempts to change local gun laws face sharp opposition.