Hillary Clinton


The days are dwindling in the most caustic presidential campaign in modern history. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders if  we can learn some lessons.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Ahead of the presidential election, we’ve been hearing from voters across the country and the state. Analysts have remarked on the heated rhetoric of this year’s elections; specifically language used to describe immigrants, refugees and Muslim Americans. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Lewd comments made by Trump 11 years ago have led some congressional Republicans to back away from the GOP nominee. The head of the state Republican Party says he’s not worried that Donald Trump may hurt efforts to increase GOP ranks in the General Assembly.

State GOP Chairman Brandon Bell says Trump’s recently publicized remarks about women are indefensible and unacceptable. But Bell said local voters can separate Trump from the issues backed by Rhode Island Republicans.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in the first presidential debate Monday night.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

The first televised debate in the presidential election is Monday evening. There will be just two candidates on stage, Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump. 

Leave it to Rhode Island to provide a counter-narrative to the notion that the news slows down in summer, right? Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.


While many Ocean State voters are more focused on August vacations than politics, candidates for the legislature are knocking on doors, appearing at coffee hours and pleading for votes at taverns and ethnic clubs.

RI's First Female Governor On Historic Clinton Nomination

Jul 29, 2016
Marie Aberger

As Democrat Hillary Clinton was getting ready to shatter a glass ceiling Thursday as the first woman ever to accept a presidential nomination from a major U.S. political party, Governor Gina Raimondo was preparing to return home to watch Clinton's speech on television with her family.

Wikimedia Commons

  Democrat Hillary Clinton got some good news from Pennsylvania today with a Suffolk University public opinion survey showing her up 9 points in the Keystone State over Republican Donald Trump in the presidential election.

In a four –way contest with Green Party nominee Dr. Jill Stein and Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson the mix, Clinton led Trump, 46 to 37 percent. Johnson got 5 percent and Stein was at 3 percent with 9 percent undecided.

John Bender / RIPR

  Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders met with Rhode Island delegates Wednesday morning. Sanders is working to convince his most ardent supporters to vote for the Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. But many remain unconvinced. When she received the nomination Tuesday night, some Sanders delegates walked out.

In the Ocean State, Sanders won the primary by some 10 percentage points. Rhode Island Sanders delegate Lauren Niedel said many delegates like her are still waiting to hear Clinton’s speech before deciding whether to support her.


Update: Bill Clinton and Rev. Jesse Jackson to attend Weiner funeral Tuesday at Temple Beth-El in Providence at 11 a.m.

Mark Weiner of East Greenwich, a confidante of Hillary and Bill Clinton, former Rhode Island state Democratic chairman, and top fund raiser for the Democratic Party, both nationally and in the Ocean State, has died after a battle with cancer. He was  62.

  The Republican National Convention that nominated Donald Trump is history. The Democratic convention that is poised to tap Hillary Clinton begins today. 

John Bender / RIPR

Bernie Sanders campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination is winding down. Rhode Island Public Radio political analyst Scott MacKay ponders what’s next for the Vermont senator and the movement he and his followers built. 

Speaking Monday, U.S. Senator Jack Reed echoed calls for unity among Democrats in the lead up to the presidential election. But Reed stopped short of saying it's time for fellow Senator Bernie Sanders to drop out of the Democratic nominating contest. 

"That’s a decision that Senator Sanders is going to have to make," Reed said "But I think it should be clearer and clearer to him that we have to be a united party to be successful in November."

The political season keeps zipping along, with the calendar turning toward May. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, you can share your tips and comments, and follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.