this I believe

This I Believe Rhode Island: Hope

22 hours ago

  Hope.  It's what keeps us going when storm clouds move into our lives, in those darkest moments when there seems to be no glimmer of light.  Hope.  The poet Emily Dickinson said, "Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul -- and sings without the words -- and never stops at all."  And that's what we hear about hope from Samantha Andersen.

Samantha Andersen is an independent educational consultant living in Pawtucket.  After living in various states across the country, she settled in Rhode Island in 2012, and believes that in the Ocean State she has found her "forever home."

This I Believe Rhode Island: Real Girls

Aug 25, 2015

  The 19th-century poet Ralph Waldo Emerson got it right: “To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.”  But, as we all know, such words sometimes make simple what is actually far more complicated.  Being truly unique and sustaining that can be a chronic challenge, especially when the world's voices shout for you to move in a different, more compliant direction.  Going against the tide takes courage, as we hear from eighteen-year-old Grace Miner.

Grace Miner is about to enter her senior year at East Greenwich High School.

  All of us have an overflowing collection of early-life experiences and memories.  Some are glorious and some, well, not so much.  Whether these memories are warm and fuzzy or profoundly traumatic, presumably all of us can reach into the rich assortment and pull out at least a handful of truly formative, perhaps life-altering experiences.  And that's what we hear from Mike Fink.

Mike Fink is an English professor at the Rhode Island School of Design. He has produced columns in a wide range of local and national magazines and earned the Providence Journal's Metcalf Award and the National Conference for Community Justice Award, as well as the Never Again Award for journalism.

  All of us face personal challenges in our lives, some bigger and more intimidating than others.  Some people wear their challenges on their sleeves, and are quite public about, for example, relationship struggles, learning disabilities, mental illness, and addictions.  Others are much more private about the daunting issues in their lives.  Thirteen-year-old Lily Barker has decided that sharing her special challenge is quite liberating.

 

Lily Barker is about to enter the eighth grade at the Gordon School in East Providence.  She lives with her family in Warren.

This I Believe Rhode Island: The Wild Place

Aug 4, 2015

  The famed cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead once opined, "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world.

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