Data released Monday by the Latino Policy Institute at Roger Williams University show that families with mixed immigration status face significant challenges. The numbers are based on a survey of nearly 180 Latino families. When at least one parent is an undocumented immigrant, researcher Kalina Brabeck says children may struggle in school.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Although Governor Gina Raimondo highlighted a desire during her 2014 campaign to provide driver's licenses to undocumented Rhode Islanders, the General Assembly is not expected to move the issue forward in this session.

In the fall of 2013, Raimondo campaign expressed disappointment via Twitter when Democratic primary rival Angel Taveras said Congress should decide the issue of driver's licenses for undocumented drivers.

A series of education bills on the agenda at the Senate Finance Committee Tuesday range from a tax credit for college graduates to funding for charter schools.

One bill would give recent college graduates a break on their state income taxes. The idea is to stem the so-called “brain drain,” when local graduates put their newly-minted degrees to work in other states.

The measure would give a maximum $5,000 credit for a worker who received a bachelor’s degree from a local college or university within the last 10 years.

While there are no estimates for how many Rhode Island residents have been affected by a Texas court ruling halting the expansion of an immigration order from President Barack Obama, immigration attorneys at Dorcas International Institute in Providence say they are urging clients to begin the application process anyway.

The ruling affects people brought to the United States as children between 2007 and 2010. They would have been eligible to apply for protected status for the first time Wednesday, but the federal government has temporarily halted the program.


Congressman David Cicilline is bringing the chair of the congressional Immigration Task Force to Rhode Island Wednesday evening to discuss the president’s executive order on immigration.  The public forum will focus on preventing residents from getting caught up in scams.

That’s been a problem since President Obama issued an executive order back in November that offers a legal reprieve to some in the country illegally and parents with children who are U.S. citizens.

File / RIPR

The Rhode Island chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union is urging Gov. Lincoln Chafee to revise how the state implements the Secure Communities program.

Secure Communities requires local law enforcement to hand over people charged with crimes or minor infractions for deportation. Earlier this year, Chafee required a deportation or removal order for anyone handed over to the feds. ACLU director Steve Brown said immigrants need more protection.

There’s reaction from across the nation to president Obama’s executive action making sweeping changes to the immigration system.  Here in Rhode Island the leader of House republicans, Brian Newberry said the president’s actions show disrespect for the law.

There are an estimated 35,000 undocumented residents living in the state. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Catherine Welch sat down with immigration attorney Roberto Gonzalez to discuss how the president’s actions will change lives here.

U.S. Capitol

Rhode Island’s congressional delegation is reacting to President Barack Obama’s executive order on immigration.  In a speech Thursday, the President outlined a plan that could protect some 5 million people in the country illegally from deportation.

John Bender / RIPR

Former delegates to the 1986 Constitutional Convention are speaking out against the event Rhode Islanders will vote on November 4th. 

1986 was the last time the state held a Constitutional Convention.  The state can hold one once every ten years, pending voter approval.  Delegates are elected to the convention which creates legislation then voted on by the public; bypassing the general assembly.  Critics say the delegates can be easily swayed by special interest groups, because they are not seeking reelection.  Tom Izzo was a delegate in 1986.

The main promise of the Affordable Care Act was - and is - to get more Americans covered by health insurance. But news today about Walmart's dropping coverage for 30,000 part-time workers reminds us there's still a rocky road to coverage for some.

With open enrollment for coverage through the health insurance exchanges right around the corner (Nov. 15), I thought it might be a good time to shine a spotlight on a couple of groups affected.

The federal government has not asked Rhode Island to shelter some of the migrant children entering the country by the thousands from Central America.  More than 100 are already living in the state.

There are currently 119 kids in Rhode Island.  That’s according to data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. These children were not moved here by the federal government, but placed with sponsors, who are family or friends already living in the U.S. The placement has been happening since January. It’s unclear how long the children will be staying.

Republican Second Congressional District candidate Rhue Reis joins Bonus Q+A to talk about his challenge to Democratic Congressman Jim Langevin, and a host of related issues, including jobs and the economy; the federal budget; Obamacare; immigration, and more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Second District Congressman Jim Langevin joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss President Obama's State of the Union address; Clay Pell's entry in the Democratic primary for governor; and his re-election battle with Republican Rhue Reis. 

Flo Jonic / RIPR

The most sweeping immigration reform bill in a generation is slowly making its way through Congress.  This morning, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Flo Jonic talks to East Providence immigration attorney Roberto Gonzalez on the impact this legislation would have on Rhode Islanders.


As immigration legislation makes its way through the Senate, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Scott MacKay talks with Senator Sheldon Whitehouse about the immigration bill, and what happened to the gun bill that went down in the Senate.