immigration

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Following the election of Donald Trump as President, immigrants are expressing concerns that his harsh rhetoric now promises to become policy in the new administration. In Rhode Island, advocates who work with immigrants and refugees say there aren’t enough immigration lawyers to answer their clients’ concerns. 

John Bender

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza hosted residents Wednesday night concerned about the future under President-elect Donald Trump. 

RIPR FILE

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza joins several mayors nationwide in formally announcing no plans to change immigration policies in the face of a Donald Trump presidency. 

Progreso Latino

Immigrants across the nation are reacting to Donald Trump’s election victory. Rhode Island-based social service agency Progreso Latino serves immigrants around Providence and Pawtucket. Director Mario Bueno says many of his clients are still trying to digest the news of Trump’s win. But he says there’s already fear about Trump's plans to end some immigration amnesty programs.

Elisabeth Harrison

This week, in our RhodyVotes ’16 election coverage, we aired a conversation with Republicans about why they do, or do not, support Donald Trump. One piece of the conversation ended up on the cutting room floor, but it raised interesting questions about immigration. We’re going to spend a few minutes discussing those comments now.

Listenwise helps teachers use stories from their local public radio station with students in their classrooms. Working with RIPR we identify relevant local news stories, design and develop classroom resources around them and make them available for free on the Education Blog. If you want to find more public radio stories and lessons for your middle and high school ELA, social studies, and science classrooms you can sign up for a free account! 

Rilind Abazi

 

Rilind Abazi was only a baby when he and his family fled Kosovo for Macedonia during his country's war in the late '90s.

"We were received by a family of strangers, we didn't know them, but we've become family friends," said Abazi. And now he's trying to return the favor.

Wikimedia Commons

If you’re wealthy, you may see the British exit from Europe’s economy as an opportunity. 

ACLU

Attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union are expected in court today for a Rhode Island immigration case that began four years ago. It centers on Ada Morales, a North Providence resident who was detained by immigration officials despite being a U.S. citizen.

Lawyers on the case are seeking summary judgment to expedite the case as it moves towards a trial. ACLU attorney Jennifer Chang-Newell says the detainment violated Morales’ constitutional rights.

Data released Monday by the Latino Policy Institute at Roger Williams University show that families with mixed immigration status face significant challenges. The numbers are based on a survey of nearly 180 Latino families. When at least one parent is an undocumented immigrant, researcher Kalina Brabeck says children may struggle in school.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Although Governor Gina Raimondo highlighted a desire during her 2014 campaign to provide driver's licenses to undocumented Rhode Islanders, the General Assembly is not expected to move the issue forward in this session.

In the fall of 2013, Raimondo campaign expressed disappointment via Twitter when Democratic primary rival Angel Taveras said Congress should decide the issue of driver's licenses for undocumented drivers.

A series of education bills on the agenda at the Senate Finance Committee Tuesday range from a tax credit for college graduates to funding for charter schools.

One bill would give recent college graduates a break on their state income taxes. The idea is to stem the so-called “brain drain,” when local graduates put their newly-minted degrees to work in other states.

The measure would give a maximum $5,000 credit for a worker who received a bachelor’s degree from a local college or university within the last 10 years.

While there are no estimates for how many Rhode Island residents have been affected by a Texas court ruling halting the expansion of an immigration order from President Barack Obama, immigration attorneys at Dorcas International Institute in Providence say they are urging clients to begin the application process anyway.

The ruling affects people brought to the United States as children between 2007 and 2010. They would have been eligible to apply for protected status for the first time Wednesday, but the federal government has temporarily halted the program.

RIPR FILE

Congressman David Cicilline is bringing the chair of the congressional Immigration Task Force to Rhode Island Wednesday evening to discuss the president’s executive order on immigration.  The public forum will focus on preventing residents from getting caught up in scams.

That’s been a problem since President Obama issued an executive order back in November that offers a legal reprieve to some in the country illegally and parents with children who are U.S. citizens.

File / RIPR

The Rhode Island chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union is urging Gov. Lincoln Chafee to revise how the state implements the Secure Communities program.

Secure Communities requires local law enforcement to hand over people charged with crimes or minor infractions for deportation. Earlier this year, Chafee required a deportation or removal order for anyone handed over to the feds. ACLU director Steve Brown said immigrants need more protection.

Pages