local feature

Alex Braunstein / RIPR

The City of Providence has a new work of public art. Installations have popped up in public spaces across the city over the past year. The latest is a large mural called “BattleCat,” painted by an Austrian artist who goes by the name NYCHOS.

It’s a part of a series of paintings created by international artists visiting the city through a residency program.

Kathleen Gorman

Hundreds of thousands of Rhode  Islanders receive state assistance like food stamps and Medicaid. The agency that helps connect them with those benefits - the Department of Human Services - is in the midst of a major reorganization. 

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

 

Few people know that Providence is home to a plaza designed by the architect I.M. Pei, the man behind the famous pyramids outside the Louvre Museum in Paris. In the 1960s, Providence hired Pei to redesign Cathedral Square during a push for urban renewal. But the effort failed to attract people or achieve the renown of some of Pei's later projects.

Will Hart / Creative Commons License

Labor Day marks the end of summer. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay reminds us that this holiday that honors workers once meant much more in Rhode Island.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave speak with Frank Tweedie, Dean of the Johnson and Wales University School of Engineering and Design.

This week, the University opened the John J. Bowen Center for Science and Innovation. The 71,000 square foot building is the first to be completed on the vacant I-195 land in Providence. Tweedie talks about the new facility, as well as the school’s approach to science, engineering and biotech training.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

A Connecticut-based company operating at a Westerly quarry embroiled in controversy since 2010 has been gone for nearly a year. But residents are still restless about the stockpiles of stone dust they left behind and the potential impacts to their health. The family that owns the quarry is now renting it to another company tasked with cleaning it up. Local, state and federal officials got a tour of the progress.

Benjamin Bouvier, Elliott Liebling / RIPR

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates nearly a third of Americans are pre-diabetic. Many more are already diabetic. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

A first-time candidate is challenging one of the most powerful Democrats in the General Assembly, House Majority Leader John DeSimone. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The residency case involving state Rep. John Carnevale has resulted in an open seat in the House of Representatives. 

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

 

This week Mark and Dave speak with Pawtucket Mayor Donald Grebien about the RI Infrastructure Bank. The quasi-public agency awarded more than $17 million to fund green municipal projects.

PETER GOLDBERG / Gamm Theatre

Across Rhode Island, local theaters are gearing up for their fall season. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Chuck Hinman traveled to the Contemporary Theater Company in Wakefield to talk with Terry Shea, an actor and director who also covers theater for Motif Magazine. Shea has a line on what to expect from the great variety of local theater that Rhode Island has to offer, from the well-established to the up and coming.

albertogp123 / flickr/creative commons license

Rhode Island students scored a little bit better this spring on the annual standardized test known as PARCC, or the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers.

In the second year of the test, scores improved by an average of 5 percentage points in math and 2 percentage points in English.  But State Education Commissioner Ken Wagner said gaps between urban and suburban students showed little or no change, and in some cases worsened.

U.S. Drought Monitor

This summer in the Northeast, if you happen to have had an irrigation system on your farm, your crop fields might have been just fine, or not. "We just couldn't work the land. We were so busy trying to put out irrigation pipe,” said Farmer Mike Wisseman. His motto is “Irrigation is Irritation” because pumps break and hoses kink.

Wisseman, along with his family, runs Warner Farm, located on the Connecticut River in Sunderland, Massachusetts. Wisseman said irrigation from the river can't be his primary source of water. To get water to one field, another has to go without.

John Bender / RIPR


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