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RIPR FILE

Once again, Rhode Island lawmakers are ensnared in a joust over extending ethics oversight of the General Assembly. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says the measure isn’t likely to usher in change on Smith Hill.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week, they’re joined by Cheryl Snead, the CEO and founder of Bannecker Industries of North Smithfield. Snead is also chair of the Women’s Enterprise Forum, which advises non-profit which works to foster and certify women-owned businesses around the country. The topic is growing opportunities for women to own their own business.

When to listen:

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50 p.m.

Richard W. Dionne, Jr. / 2nd Story Theatre

The current play at 2nd Story Theatre in Warren features six women, all dressed in black, simply sitting on stage, scripts in hand, talking.

Photo by Julieta Cervantes

For serious jazz fans, A Love Supreme, by saxophonist John Coltrane needs no introduction.  A Love Supreme was recorded in one day at the end of 1964, and released 51 years ago this month, in February of 1965. It’s since been recognized as one of the all-time great jazz masterworks.

On Saturday, Urban Bush Women, a group of African American dancers out of Brooklyn, bring their unique interpretation of Coltrane’s achievement to the Vets, in Providence. For this month’s Rhode Island Artscape, RIPR's Chuck Hinman reports on the psychology of Coltrane and jazz improvisation.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

After years of effort, Deepwater Wind expects to complete the first offshore wind farm in the US later this year. Supporters say the project off the coast of Block Island is an important milestone that will bolster the growth of renewable energy. 

Photo Courtesy of Pam Rubinoff

The Hurricane of 1938 toppled some 275 million trees across New England. Today – with more trees and more buildings  – state officials see wind damage as a statewide threat because of climate change and the potential for more frequent, extreme weather events. In the next installment of our series Battle With the Sea, we look at how some homeowners are preparing to withstand winds with the force of a hurricane. 

Cynthia Goldsmith / CDC

More countries are reporting person-to-person transmission of the Zika virus. And the FDA has just recommended that people returning from Zika-affected areas postpone donating blood for four weeks. Those are just some of the updates about a virus that's leaving more questions than answers.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

In the aftermath of allegations of past sexual abuse of students by employees at St. George’s School in Middletown, the school has been accused of violating Rhode Island’s duty to report law for abused and neglected children.

But, as Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison first reported, this law is not as clear as it appears to be. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Joseph Azrack, chairman of the I-195 District Development Commission, touts 2016 as a time when the district will move closer to the goal of becoming an economic generator for the state.

Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

The latest offering at Trinity Rep is “The Hunchback of Seville.'' Rhode Island Public Radio’s Bill Gale was unconvinced at first, but this bright and bold, silly and crude production won him over.

Yes, and you can add wacky and wild and sometimes sophomoric in the extreme. Written by Brown University graduate Charise Castro Smith this play looks in on lots of things, from feminism to the Spanish inquisition and the gross side of the development of the New World. It's filled with explosive imagination, and the romp of youth.

Federal Wildlife Service

Rhode Island’s New England neighbors are moving aggressively forward with legalizing marijuana. RIPR political analyst says the Ocean State shouldn’t be last to tap a new source of state money.

Whatever you think about legal marijuana, it is difficult to defend the current prohibition of the weed. 

New Hampshire Public Radio

The only sure element of the 2016 presidential sweepstakes, in the aftermath of the New Hampshire primary , is that both Democrats and Republicans now face long nominating battles.

The party elites hate this – short and sweet nominating contests work best for them. Long campaigns drain money and effort away from the general election and create internecine jousts. That doesn’t mean, as in the Democratic battle of 2008, that the primary wounds can’t be healed, but it does take time.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Last night in his first State of the City address, Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza painted a positive outlook for the city, despite a cumulative deficit of more than $13 million and a long legal battle with the city’s firefighters.

Mark Turek / Ocean State Theatre

“Break A Leg” is a well-known (if rarely seriously used) phrase to encourage an actor before he or she goes on stage. Now, Warwick's Ocean State Theatre presents “Breaking Legs,” a highly farcical comedy combining the theater world and the mafia. Bill Gale went to see it anyway.

The production, directed by Trinity Rep's Fred Sullivan Jr., turns out to be an overdone, over silly piece that somehow manages to be pretty darn funny.

John Bender / RIPR

Voters head to the polls in New Hampshire Tuesday to pick presidential candidates in the New Hampshire primary. Dozens of Rhode Islanders have been trekking to the Granite State to help candidates from both parties make their case.

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