local feature

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Art and medicine have long been intertwined - from the earliest depictions of human anatomy to modern art therapy. A new art exhibit (“Interstice: Memory, Mind, and Alzheimer's Disease," open through September 9 in the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts at Brown University) takes that relationship in a new direction. A neuroscientist and artist teamed up with fellow artists to explore what it’s like to have Alzheimer’s Disease. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

A proposed ballpark for the PawSox in Providence and the vacant so-called Superman Building might seem to have little in common. Yet both raise questions involving economic development and the possible use of taxpayer subsidies. 

Local Programs Aim To Stop The 'Summer Slide'

Aug 26, 2015
Katherine Doherty / RIPR

Students are about to return to their classrooms after a long summer break. One thing their teachers are all wondering: how much did they forget over the vacation?

Elisabeth Harrison

Students and teachers are returning to classrooms across Rhode Island, including Central Falls, where a new superintendent has just taken charge. 


Opponents of mandatory HPV vaccinations want the Rhode Island General Assembly to stop requiring the vaccines for all seventh graders. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders if  politicians should be allowed to interfere in medical decisions.

State Rep. Joseph McNamara (D-Warwick), chairman of the state Democratic Party, joins Bonus Q+A to discuss education, former House speaker Gordon Fox, how Democratic dominance of the General Assembly has affected the state, and other issues.

For more McNamara, check our Political Roundtable session with him. 

Ian Donnis / RINPR

State Rep. Joseph McNamara (D-Warwick), chairman of the Rhode Island Democratic Party, joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss new revelations about 38 Studios; an apparent slowdown in the path to a Providence ballpark; and the hiring of a new head for the I-195 Commission.

For more McNamara, check our Bonus Q&A interview with him.

Child and Family RI

Rhode Island puts too many children in group homes. Everyone agrees that’s bad.

But dig a little deeper, and it seems Rhode Island does have some alternatives: therapists, family case managers, parenting coaches, visiting nurses. Lots of nonprofits serving children and families. So what's the disconnect? Here's a look in my reporter's notebook.

John Bender / RIPR

As we enter the dog days of summer, even night air offers little respite for from the stifling heat. In Providence, many of the city’s children rely on public pools to stay cool. Last year the Davey Lopes Pool in South Providence reopened following a controversial closure.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender revisits the pool a year later, which many call an anchor of the community.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

For the past week, we’ve been focusing on "Children in Crisis," our series about Rhode Island’s Department of Children, Youth, and Families. The agency is struggling to cope with an influx of neglect and abuse cases and has run into financial trouble. Now, we explore how a national "home visiting"  program aims to keep families from entering the system in the first place.


Gov. Gina Raimondo wants to attract more tourists to Rhode Island. As summer winds down, RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay has some ideas.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The Department of Children, Youth, and Families is struggling with an influx of children who have been abused and neglected. Many of their cases go before Rhode Island’s Family Court, where judges play a key role in deciding when children can return to their homes. The drama of lives in upheaval unfolds every day of the week in the Garrahy Judicial complex, downtown Providence.

State Rep. Carlos Tobon is a freshman lawmaker from Pawtucket. He’s among the legislators calling for keeping the PawSox at their current home of McCoy Stadium. Tobon stopped by our studio to talk about that and other issues.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island doesn’t have enough foster families to meet a growing need. That’s one reason the Department of Children, Youth, and Families places a higher percentage of kids in group homes than almost any other state. DCYF officials acknowledge the problem. But recruiting new foster families has been tough.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

State Representative Carlos Tobon (D-Pawtucket) joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss the PawSox; fallout from the State Police report in Cranston; and how the state is working with the Brookings Institution to develop a new economic strategy.