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Photo Courtesy of Pam Rubinoff

The Hurricane of 1938 toppled some 275 million trees across New England. Today – with more trees and more buildings  – state officials see wind damage as a statewide threat because of climate change and the potential for more frequent, extreme weather events. In the next installment of our series Battle With the Sea, we look at how some homeowners are preparing to withstand winds with the force of a hurricane. 

Cynthia Goldsmith / CDC

More countries are reporting person-to-person transmission of the Zika virus. And the FDA has just recommended that people returning from Zika-affected areas postpone donating blood for four weeks. Those are just some of the updates about a virus that's leaving more questions than answers.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

In the aftermath of allegations of past sexual abuse of students by employees at St. George’s School in Middletown, the school has been accused of violating Rhode Island’s duty to report law for abused and neglected children.

But, as Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison first reported, this law is not as clear as it appears to be. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Joseph Azrack, chairman of the I-195 District Development Commission, touts 2016 as a time when the district will move closer to the goal of becoming an economic generator for the state.

Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

The latest offering at Trinity Rep is “The Hunchback of Seville.'' Rhode Island Public Radio’s Bill Gale was unconvinced at first, but this bright and bold, silly and crude production won him over.

Yes, and you can add wacky and wild and sometimes sophomoric in the extreme. Written by Brown University graduate Charise Castro Smith this play looks in on lots of things, from feminism to the Spanish inquisition and the gross side of the development of the New World. It's filled with explosive imagination, and the romp of youth.

Federal Wildlife Service

Rhode Island’s New England neighbors are moving aggressively forward with legalizing marijuana. RIPR political analyst says the Ocean State shouldn’t be last to tap a new source of state money.

Whatever you think about legal marijuana, it is difficult to defend the current prohibition of the weed. 

New Hampshire Public Radio

The only sure element of the 2016 presidential sweepstakes, in the aftermath of the New Hampshire primary , is that both Democrats and Republicans now face long nominating battles.

The party elites hate this – short and sweet nominating contests work best for them. Long campaigns drain money and effort away from the general election and create internecine jousts. That doesn’t mean, as in the Democratic battle of 2008, that the primary wounds can’t be healed, but it does take time.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Last night in his first State of the City address, Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza painted a positive outlook for the city, despite a cumulative deficit of more than $13 million and a long legal battle with the city’s firefighters.

Mark Turek / Ocean State Theatre

“Break A Leg” is a well-known (if rarely seriously used) phrase to encourage an actor before he or she goes on stage. Now, Warwick's Ocean State Theatre presents “Breaking Legs,” a highly farcical comedy combining the theater world and the mafia. Bill Gale went to see it anyway.

The production, directed by Trinity Rep's Fred Sullivan Jr., turns out to be an overdone, over silly piece that somehow manages to be pretty darn funny.

John Bender / RIPR

Voters head to the polls in New Hampshire Tuesday to pick presidential candidates in the New Hampshire primary. Dozens of Rhode Islanders have been trekking to the Granite State to help candidates from both parties make their case.

sand dunes
Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Gov. Gina Raimondo’s proposed budget devotes about 1.1 percent of all state spending to the state’s two major environmental agencies: the Department of Environmental Management and the Coastal Resources Management Council. The DEM got a small bump from the governor’s last budget, while the CRMC held steady. We break down the numbers.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Former Providence mayor Buddy Cianci was eulogized Monday after thousands of admirers visited City Hall over the weekend to pay their respects to the man who led the capital city for a total of more than 20 years.

During the funeral service, former mayor Joseph R. Paolino Jr., who served in between the stints known as Buddy I and Buddy II, recalled Cianci as a remarkably skilled politician.

cmh2315fl / flickr

The moment of truth in the presidential primary campaign comes tomorrow as voters in New Hampshire head to polls for the New Hampshire primary. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay, who has covered Granite State primaries since 1980, has a roadmap to the contest.

The Bottom Line: Real Estate Comeback

Feb 5, 2016

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave chat with Arthur Yatsko, president of the Rhode Island Association of Realtors, about the rising home prices and what millennials want from a home.


Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo’s $9 billion budget proposal would increase funding for public schools and give a small bump to colleges and universities.


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