master lever

Rhode Island's crop of newly elected officials are starting to staff up as we move toward the Thanksgiving lull later this month. Thanks for stopping by. As always, feel free to drop me a line at idonnis (at) ripr (org) and to follow me on the twitters. Let's get to it.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Eliminating the master lever in Rhode Island elections is picking up steam in the General Assembly. RIPR political analyst  Scott MacKay says getting rid of straight party voting may be much ado about not much.

The Rhode Island House of Representatives recently voted unanimously to end the so-called master lever, a relic of the state’s urban political machine past. A conga line of statewide elected politicians, from Gov. Lincoln Chafee down to Secretary of State Ralph Mollis, support this change.

Welcome back to my Friday column. Your tips and thoughts are always welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me through the week via the twitters. Let's head in.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Providence Ward 14 City Councilor David Salvatore, chairman of the council's Ways and Means Committee, joins Political Roundtable to discuss the emergence of Providence's finances as a campaign issue; the impact of a "People's Pledge" in the Democratic primary; the soaring cost of growing state Medicaid enrollment; and the possible effect of eliminating the master lever.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The Rhode Island House, in an abrupt change after years of indifference to the issue, voted unanimously Thursday to eliminate the use of the master lever in Rhode Island in 2014. Through her spokeswoman, Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed said she's "keeping an open mind about the legislation to eliminate the straight ticket voting option from Rhode Island ballots."

Pages