Medicaid

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

70 employees at the state Department of Human Services have received layoff notices because of a system-wide reorganization. It's part of a shift to online applications for benefits like food stamps.

The head of Rhode Island’s Medicaid program is stepping down from her post. That will be the second vacancy at a top state health position.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

State health officials say we’re spending too much on nursing homes. Instead, they say, we could be caring for people, for less money, at home.

Courtesy RI Department of Human Services

  Rhode Island’s new online portal for programs like Medicaid and food stamps is set to go live mid-September. The new system will streamline the process for people seeking services. It could also impact some DHS employees.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

This September, Rhode Island’s Department of Human Services launches a new online portal for health and social service benefits. It’s the state’s biggest IT project ever. 

 

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week, Mark and Dave speak with Neighborhood Health Plan President and CEO Peter Marino. Neighborhood Health is launching a new initiative aimed at streamlining the sometimes thorny process of navigating Medicaid and Medicare.

When to listen:

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50 p.m.

Rhode Island Dept. of Human Services

Rhode Islanders seeking medical or food stamp assistance will soon be able to complete their application online, all in one go.

Gilead Sciences

Rhode Island Medicaid is revisiting its policy for determining who receives pricey hepatitis C drugs. Current policy limits who gets treated and when, but those restrictions could be loosened.

Kristin Gourlay / ripr

  Hospitals could face another rate cut under the Medicaid budget proposed for this fiscal year. Tension over the cuts came up during a budget hearing this week.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The House Finance Committee begins budget hearings next week, and top of the agenda is Medicaid. One in four Rhode Islanders is enrolled in the health care program for the low income and disabled. The state spends more than a third of its budget on it. But a major effort has been underway to trim expenses and transform the way Medicaid delivers care.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

A budget proposal is like a map, showing you where an agency wants to invest more money, and where it plans to cut. It reveals an administration’s priorities for the future– and holds them accountable for what they did or didn’t accomplish in the past. I’ll be your tour guide for this year’s health and human services proposal.

RIPR

Elizabeth Roberts, secretary of the Executive Office of Health and Human Services, joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss the Raimondo administration's attempt to cut Medicaid spending and improve the troubled state Department of Children, Youth and Familes, as well as the outlook on the governor's truck-toll plan.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Rhode Island Public Radio will be taking a look at some of the top stories from 2015 in the coming days – from developments in the 38 Studios case to the state’s first female governor. But for this week’s The Pulse, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Kristin Gourlay joins news director Elisabeth Harrison to talk about some of the health care stories that deserve a second look.

Rhode Islanders with Medicaid coverage may have a more difficult time finding a doctor. And every obstetrics and gynecology practice in the state has a waiting list. Those are just two of the findings in a massive survey just completed by the state’s health department.

RI Dept. of Health

Rhode Island may not have enough primary care doctors to meet the need. That’s one conclusion from a major survey of the state’s health care inventory. Another conclusion: mental health resources are lacking.   

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