miriam hospital

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The price of naloxone, a drug that can reverse a drug overdose, has skyrocketed. That’s affecting efforts to prevent overdose deaths. Michelle MacKenzie runs an overdose prevention program at the Miriam Hospital. She says when her program started buying and distributing the injectable overdose rescue drug naloxone, in 2006, it cost about a dollar a vial. Today it’s $15 a vial.

“So if we had to pay $15 a vial, I mean, last year we distributed upwards of 800 kits, which is 1600 vials of naloxone. We would have been like, 200. I mean, think about that,” said MacKenzie.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A community forum on drug overdose and addiction drew a standing room only crowd at the Miriam hospital last night.  Organizers hope to keep the conversation going beyond the evening’s speeches and questions.

U.S. National Library of Medicine / National Institutes of Health

Miriam Hospital cardiologist and Brown medical school professor Dr. Barbara Roberts said the Food and Drug Administration’s proposal to ban trans fats in processed foods is long overdue. Trans fats, or partially hydrogenated oils, are added to foods like cookies, ready-to-use frostings, and microwave popcorn to extend their shelf life. Scientists have known for decades that they can lead to hardened arteries and higher bad cholesterol.

The Miriam Hospital has officially announced the opening of its new Kidney Stone Center.

The center had a quiet opening a few months ago, but now The Miriam Hospital is letting the rest of Rhode Island know that its new center combines specialists such as urologists and dietitians to take a comprehensive approach for treating kidney stones.

Kidney stones are crystallized pieces of material that form in the kidney. Their size ranges from granular to the size of a pearl, and are often painful as they pass through the urinary tract.

Heart-Healthy Diet Good for Your Wallet

Apr 1, 2013

The Mediterranean diet. It’s all the rage now. Rich in olive oil, fruits and vegetables and low on meat, it’s said to promote cardiac health and weight loss. But researchers say it also helps stretch the food dollar.

Rhode Island food bank recipients who completed a six-week course in cooking Mediterranean-style decreased their total food spending, purchased healthier food items and improved their food security. That, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition.