Narragansett Bay

Environment
6:14 am
Mon May 18, 2015

Biologists Plan To Continue Tracking Beluga Whales In Narragansett Bay

Credit Robin Angliss / NOAA

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration plans to continue to monitor daily the three beluga whales exploring Narragansett Bay. Biologists want to make sure they return safely back to their Arctic habitat.

Read more
Environment
3:26 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

Three Healthy, Adult Beluga Whales Still Swimming In Narragansett Bay

Three beluga whales spotted in Narragansett Bay are healthy adult males, likely from the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada. 

(Video courtesy of Matt Jarbeau)

Read more
On Politics
4:18 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

RI DEM reduces Striped Bass Catch For 2015 Season

In what Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management chief Janet Coit says is an effort to protect the striper fishery, DEM today filed new regulations for the recreational striped bass fishery for the 2015 fishing season.

The new rules set a bag limit of one striped bass per person per day, at a 28-inch minimum size, down from a daily limit of two fish per person last season. On the commercial side, the regulations will remain the same as last year – five fish per vessel per day, with a 34 inch minimum. But the commercial quota will be reduced by 25 percent.

Read more
Environment
5:37 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

New Report: Ocean Acidification Threatens Shellfish Industry

Credit Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Rhode Island is among 15 states whose shellfish industry is at long-term economic risk from the effects of ocean acidification. That’s according to new study funded by the National Science Foundation.

Read more
Environment
2:06 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

State Lawmakers Want To Find Out What Acidifying Waters Mean For The Ocean State

State lawmakers hope to create a council to study what ocean acidification could mean for Rhode Island's waters.
Credit RIPR FILE

State legislators have introduced a resolution that would create a special commission to study the effects of ocean acidification on Rhode Island.

The world’s oceans are becoming increasingly acidic from all the carbon dioxide we’re dumping into them. Important habitats and fisheries, like shellfish, are rapidly degrading in many parts of the world due to ocean’s changing chemistry.

Read more

Pages