Peter Kilmartin

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

There have been anecdotal reports about a rise in hate crimes around the country since the presidential election. But it remains unclear whether there’s been a similar uptick in Rhode Island. That's because the state has no centralized mechanism for reporting suspected hate crimes. Attorney General Peter Kilmartin's office says the only way to find out would be to survey local police departments.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin will once again try to make drunk driving penalties more stringent in the Ocean State. Kilmartin’s office says he has filed legislation for the past five years to try to stiffen sentencing and intends to do so again this legislative session. He wants drivers who kill someone while under the influence to face a maximum of 30, up from 15, years in prison. And drivers who injure someone while intoxicated would face increased penalties as well. That’s a provision...

RIPR file photo

Attorneys General from across the eastern United States convene Thursday in Newport. They’re participating in a two-day conference organized by the National Association of Attorneys General. Amy Kempe from the Rhode Island Attorney General’s office says the meeting will focus on making the most of taxpayer money through partnerships. “We are hoping to have a very robust discussion on the different types of partnerships, how agencies, whether it be law enforcement, or administrative, or even...

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

James Doyle, the popular, longest serving mayor of Pawtucket and a fixture in the city’s political leadership for generations, died Friday night. He was 78. And old-school politician universally known as `Jim’ who climbed the city’s Democratic political ladder, Doyle served for six terms as mayor, until the end of 2010, when Don Grebien won election. A social studies teacher at Pawtucket West High School, now Shea High School, Doyle was active in Democratic politics. He was first elected to...

August is on the way out, and legislative primary races are coming up fast. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, you can send your tips and comments my way , and follow me through the week on the twitters . Here we go. 1. As Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza approaches the mid-point in his term, the tough choices needed to put the city on a more stable financial footing still loom ahead. "We didn't get here overnight, we're not going to get out of it overnight," Elorza said, in...

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

The end of the criminal investigation over 38 Studios is sparking debate about whether material from the probe should be released to the public. The dispute reflects the questions many residents still have about the state-backed video game company and its costly meltdown.

Don't look now, but it's barely more than 30 days until the state primary election that will help shape the next class of state lawmakers. Meanwhile, debate about 38 Studios has again reached a fever pitch. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome , and you can follow me through the week on the twitters . Here we go. 1. "The past is never dead. It isn't even past." William Faulkner's words aptly sum up the lack of resolution felt by many...

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Five civil liberties and open government groups called Tuesday for the public release of the material from the 38 Studios investigation.

Ian Donnis

State Police and Attorney General Peter Kilmartin will pursue no criminal charges after a years-long investigation into 38 Studios, the company that won a $75 million public subsidy to move to Rhode Island, then went bankrupt, leaving taxpayers on the hook. In announcing results of the investigation, State Police Col. Steven O'Donnell said a bad business deal doesn't necessarily provide grounds for a criminal indictment.

Flo Jonic / RIPR

Rhode Island’s Attorney General Peter Kilmartin is joining a group of his peers calling on Congress to fund research into the prevention of gun violence. By law, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hasn’t been able to use public funds to research gun violence prevention. Many public health researchers believe that has stymied their ability to find ways to reduce gun violence. Now, attorneys general from 14 states are asking Congress to lift that ban and direct funding to the CDC...

Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea joins Bonus Q&A to talk about lobbying reform, Voter ID, public records, and much more.

The Rhode Island House Judiciary Committee discussed legislation involving sex trafficking in the state Tuesday. A proposed bill would require all convicted sex trafficking criminals to also register as sex offenders. Attorney General Peter Kilmartin’s Spokesperson Amy Kempe said the law would treat sex trafficking in the same way that other sex offenses are dealt with. “It’s a right step, it’s a smart move to make, so that people will know if they have somebody who has been convicted of sex...

John Bender / RIPR

State officials are asking the court to appoint a receiver in their quest to stop pollution from a metal recycling business on the Providence waterfront. The site has been the subject of a years-long battle involving environmental groups and state regulators. The case recently reached a critical turning point.

RIPR file photo

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin is renewing a push for tougher penalties that he calls a better deterrent for the harm caused by drunk drivers. “Choosing to get behind the wheel of a motor vehicle while intoxicated or impaired on drugs is like playing with a loaded firearm -- it’s dangerous and often deadly,” Kilmartin said in a statement. “Every individual who gets behind the wheel of a motor vehicle while intoxicated is risking their own life and the life of others on the roads. The...

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