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Raimondo Signs Bill Aimed At Police, Race Relations

Jul 14, 2015
Katherine Doherty

Governor Gina Raimondo has signed legislation that requires local police departments to collect and report data on race and traffic stops. The data must be submitted to the State Department of Transportation each year.

State Representative Joseph Almeida (D-Providence), who has been trying to get similar legislation passed since 1999, said the bill represents one step towards addressing Civil Rights issues in the state.

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Former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley visits the Ocean State Tuesday for a fundraiser in Jamestown.

The democrat will attend an event billed as a cookout at the home Liz and Michael Perik, an entrepreneur in education technology. Tickets start at $100 per person, and can cost as much as $2,700. The fundraiser starts at 6 p.m.

O’Malley stops in the Ocean State in between stumping in Iowa and nearby New Hampshire, which holds the nation’s first primary.

Governor Gina Raimondo has selected Colonel Christopher P. Callahan as the new Adjutant General of Rhode Island and the Commanding General of the Rhode Island National Guard.

Callahan will replace Major General Kevin McBride, who retired in June. Raimondo describes him as an experienced serviceman after 25 years and various positions in the National Guard.

RIPR FILE

Governor Gina Raimondo plans to sign the budget Tuesday for the state’s next fiscal year. The spending plan includes two of the governor’s top priorities.

Governor Raimondo says the budget will help put people back to work, fix schools, and make it easier to do business in Rhode Island. The spending plan includes money for economic incentives meant to spark job growth, and it also cuts spending on the Medcaid subsidizied healthcare program for the poor.

Elisabeth Harrison

U.S. Senator Jack Reed says the focus should be intelligence after a terrorist attack at an American gas company in France. The attack included an explosion that killed one person and injured about a dozen others.

"What you’re seeing are these lone wolf attacks," Reed said. "Very difficult to disrupt because there’s not a lot of hierarchical organization. It’s an individual one or two, who are self-radicalized in many cases."

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