Providence City Council

Buddy Cianci’s mayoral portrait is scheduled to be unveiled Thursday evening at Providence City Hall with a reception to follow at the Roma restaurant on Federal Hill.

But there has been a last-minute change of plans because one of the men slated to officiate at Cianci’s ceremony – Providence City Archivist Paul Campbell – has been suspended with pay from his $60,000 a year job.

UNITE HERE, Local 217, the hotel workers' union, is poised to support the Fogarty Building hotel project slated for a vote Tuesday by the Providence City Council's Finance Committee, if the committee backs an amendment ensuring a higher wage for workers at the hotel.

However, the Procaccianti Group, which is seeking a 13-year tax stabilization agreement to build a nine-story extended stay hotel on the site of the vacant Fogarty Building, questions whether requiring certain wages as part of the deal is legal.


Former Providence State Representative Leon Tejada  has agreed to plead guilty to federal tax and wire fraud charges.

Tejada, 50, has agreed to pay back more than $79,000 to the federal government and acknowledge that he knowingly prepared false income tax returns for clients and skimmed money from their refunds. He deposited the money into his bank account.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Mayor Jorge Elorza’s administration has reached a tentative agreement on a three-year contract with Local 1033 of the Laborers International Union of North America, which represents city employees in City Hall, the School Department and the Parks and Public Works Departments.

Courtesy of Hinckley Allen

Malcolm "Mac" Farmer III will receive the Family Service of Rhode Island’s Brighter Futures Award, which is given annually to a person or organization making an "outstanding contribution to the well-being of children.’’

The South Providence Recreation Center will be renamed tomorrow for the late John H. Rollins, a former Providence City Council member, civil rights activist and football star at both La Salle Academy and the University of Rhode Island.

John Bender / RIPR

The Providence City Council approved a new zoning ordinance limiting student housing in the city. The council voted 11-3 to approve the ordinance.

Proponents say the ordinance will help alleviate the disruptive college partying, residents say is encroaching into quiet neighborhoods. They say landlords are buying up single family homes, and filling them with college kids.

John Bender / RIPR

The American Civil Liberties Union of Rhode Island opposes a proposed Providence ordinance, that would limit the number of college students permitted to rent single-family homes. The city council votes on the issue Thursday.

In an open letter to the Providence City Council, the ACLU says the proposed ordinance is too broad in its definition of students. The ordinance, meant to tamp down on excessive partying, would affect undergraduate and graduate students; meaning for instance two married couples pursuing PhD’s could not rent a single family home in the city.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

The City of Providence is arguing that the Providence firefighters' union can't use arbitration to fight the looming implementation of a money-saving shift-change plan 

TGIF is back in the swing of RI politics after a relaxing summer break. So thanks for stopping by, and feel free to share your tips and thoughts at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and to follow me on the twitters. Let's dive in.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The Providence City Council's Finance Committee appeared unmoved Thursday night after dozens of Rhode Island Building Trades members urged the committee to approve a tax-stabilization agreement for the Procaccianti Group's proposed hotel on Fountain Street.

Although a vote was not expected during the meeting, boisterous Building Trades members appeared frustrated that concerns expressed by UNITE HERE, Local 217, have effectively slowed down the process.

Providence’s rich baseball history is on display at City Hall in a new exhibit to be formally unveiled tomorrow (May 7) at City Hall.

The exhibit, which features memorabilia, baseball cards and photographs of the city’s long and florid baseball history, is located on the third floor of City Hall.

A reception introducing the exhibit will be held at 6  p.m. tomorrow on the third floor at City Hall. It will be hosted by City Council President Luis Aponte, a Ward 10 Democrat, and City Archivist Paul Campbell, a noted Rhode Island historian.

A report from Worcester brings this unsurprising news: Members of the Worcester City Council want to study whether the city can lure the Pawtucket Red Sox to the central Massachusetts city.

Two city council members in Worcester have requested that the city work with the Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce and other groups to try to get the PawSox to move to Worcester. The plan is scheduled to be debated at a council meeting tomorrow evening, according to a report from

Don Borman

The Providence City Council is putting together an advisory commission to study the impact of moving the Pawtucket Red Sox from McCoy Stadium in Pawtucket to a new stadium in downtown Providence,  Council President Luis Aponte told Rhode Island Public Radio.

Aponte said the commission would be charged with examining the proposal advanced by the new owners of the top Boston Red Sox farm club, who announced last week their intent to shift the team from historic McCoy to a new ballpark to be built on open land along the downtown waterfront that was cleared when Route 195 was razed.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The newly elected president of the Providence City Council, Luis Aponte, joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss the use of tax stabilization agreements; the budget outlook in the capital city; Governor Gina Raimondo's early moves on the economy, and more.